Check out what our departments have to offer!

Anaesthesia

Welcome

The Department of Anaesthesia at CDHB is a busy and vibrant department with service, training, and research interests in most of the major surgical sub-specialities. The Department is very enthusiastic about having trainees at all levels of training, and is well supported by ANZCA.

Medical Staff in our Service

The Department consists of 75 Specialist Anaesthetists, 5 Medical Officers/Provisional Fellows, 28 Anaesthetic Registrars, 6 Senior House Officers, Anaesthetic Technicians, 2 Staff Nurses and 3 Secretarial/Administration staff.

All about our service

The Department of Anaesthesia is based at Christchurch Hospital and provides anaesthetic services to CDHB. The Department provides Anaesthetists for locations spread between Christchurch Hospital, Christchurch Women's Hospital (High-Risk Obstetrics) and Burwood Hospital (Orthopaedics & Plastics/Max-Fax). The annual workload consists of approximately 26,000 anaesthetics per year, of which approximately 40% are acute admissions.

Training in our service

All of the registrar posts are recognised as training posts by the Australian & New Zealand College of Anaesthetists. These posts are part of the South Island Training Scheme and Rotation. Registrars based at Christchurch are also rotated to Intensive Care and Timaru Hospital on a 3-6 monthly basis. Trainees gain exposure to the full range of anaesthesia sub-specialties including:

  • Paediatrics
  • Neurosurgery
  • Vascular and Interventional
  • Complex Head and Neck surgery
  • Cardiothoracic Surgery

Experience is also available in all other surgical sub-specialities including plastics and surgery for patients with spinal injuries.

Research

The Department shares staff with the Pain Management Centre at Burwood Hospital, the Intensive Care Unit, and the Hyperbaric Medicine Unit.

CDHB works closely with the Christchurch School of Medicine’s Department of Anaesthesia, sharing secretarial staff and office space. The Department has a strong academic focus and endeavours to create an environment where research is encouraged and supported. 

SMO / Staff Support

The registrars provide on-site out-of-hours cover at both Christchurch Women's Hospital and Christchurch Hospital. Their roles are predominantly in the operating theatre (or labour ward) but also assist with in-hospital resuscitation. The SHO provides on-site after hours cover of the Post Anaesthesia Care Unit at Burwood and also some out of hours anaesthetic service at Christchurch Hospital.

Enquiries

Click the link for detailed information regarding the South Island Training Programme.

Or contact:
Dr Frances Cammack or Dr James Dalby-Ball, Supervisor of Training
Phone (+64 3) 364 0288.

Anatomical Pathology

About the specialty

Anatomical Pathology (AP) incorporates histology (tissue), cytology (cells), and forensic (autopsy) pathology and covers the full range of organ system specialties. Individuals can specialise in one area or have a broad interest in several areas. AP is laboratory based, includes a significant amount of microscopic work, is largely within usual working hours, and does not involve regular after hours or weekend work In recent years AP has moved from being purely diagnostic to assuming an important role in the management of many cancers, and in conjunction with Molecular Pathology is becoming an exciting area with huge potential for research in cancer genetics.

Training Opportunities with the CDHB

Christchurch Hospital has seven AP training posts with vacancies variable depending on the training stage of the incumbent registrars

College(s)

Anatomical Pathologists train through the Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia.

Entry Requirements

• Completion of Post Graduate Years 1 and 2.

• Employed in a RCPA accredited training laboratory.

• The College is not involved in selecting applicants.

Application Dates for RCPA Training

• Applications can be made at any time during the year.

Training Duration

• 5-years (FTE) with the RCPA with time in at least two laboratories.

Interested in finding out more?

For an opportunity to observe within this department at the CDHB or talk about this career pathway, please make contact with the Director of Training, Rachael van der Griend, Rachael.vanderGriend@cdhb.health.nz

Useful websites

Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia: www.rcpa.edu.au

The role of the Anatomical Pathologist video: www.rcpa.edu.au/Library/PromotionalMaterial/General-Videos

Day in the life – Anatomical Pathology: www.rcpa.edu.au/Library/PromotionalMaterial/Day-In-The-Life

Kiwi Health Jobs: www.kiwihealthjobs.com/rmo/home

Burwood Spinal Service

Welcome

The Burwood Spinal Unit welcomes enquiries and is delighted to provide an overview of the service to potential candidates who may be interested in coming to the Burwood Spinal Unit (BSU) to experience a wonderful learning and training opportunity.

Why specialise in Spinal?

The BSU offers a fantastic introduction to spinal medicine, from semi acute management, right through to rehabilitation and ongoing reassessment.

Spinal medicine is an interesting specialty in its own right, however it also offers opportunity to practise in a range of other rehabilitation services. It meets the requirements for Part 1 medical training as well as formal AFRM (RACP) training requirements. Excellent clinical exposure to neurology, urology and orthopaedics is also a major advantage.

Career Prospects

The Burwood Spinal Unit is a recognised site for formal training with the Australasian Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine (AFRM) and Royal Australasian College of Physicians (RACP).

Aside from spinal medicine, rehabilitation medicine offers opportunities in the areas of Brain Injury, Stroke, Amputation, Orthopaedic, Neurological and General Rehabilitation.

Medical Staff in our Service

The BSU employs the following:

  • Three consultants 
  • Two training registrar positions, one AFRM trainee and 1 service registrar. It is also suitable for rotational medical registrars
  • One house officer

The service also hosts Fellow positions at various times.

All about our service

The BSU is located on the Burwood Hospital Campus, 11km from Christchurch Hospital. The Burwood campus also provides rehabilitation services for brain injury, pain management and services to Older Persons Health and Older Persons Mental Health. It also provides elective orthopaedic surgical services and minor plastic surgery procedures. A new 220 bed hospital opened in 2016, with full radiological services to complement the existing 100 bed facilities already on site, one of which houses the spinal unit.

The BSU consists of a 30 bed inpatient unit, including 4 transitional rehabilitation beds, and is one of only two specialist spinal units in New Zealand, the other being located in Auckland.

The spinal unit provides a comprehensive regional service and covers a catchment area which includes all of the South Island of NZ and as far north as the middle of the North Island. Acute patients are admitted via Christchurch Hospital, where they are managed in conjunction with the ICU or orthopaedic teams. When medically stable, patients are transferred out to the spinal unit for ongoing rehabilitation.

The service treats traumatic spinal injured patients (approx 50 per year) and also those with spinal impairment from non-traumatic causes. In addition to these services, non acute urological and upper limb surgery is undertaken onsite and trial of intrathecal baclofen pumps.

A suite of reassessment services is provided, including general outpatients, spasticity clinics and scheduled reassessment clinics, both onsite and peripherally, in a range of centres by a skilled MDT team.

The BSU medical staff work in teams.  There is a registrar allocated to each team and a house officer who works across the teams.  Each team conducts formal ward rounds, as well as unscheduled inpatient meetings and there is a weekly joint ward round which includes all medical staff.

Training in our service

Clinical training is excellent with exposure to neurology (particularly spinal cord medicine), neuro-urology, microbiology, orthopaedic and radiology.

The service holds weekly journal clubs/CME sessions and provides dedicated teaching sessions within the unit. Regular training from AFRM and NZ Branch Teaching programmes are provided via remote links. There are also other teaching opportunities across the site with other services and RMOs are encouraged to attend these as much as possible.

A video conference link is set up for staff to the weekly Grand Round meeting at Christchurch Hospital.

There are online library facilities and a pleasant library setting with well stocked books from the Medical Library.

Research

The BSU strongly supports research and there are usually multiple research activities being carried out at any time. The nature of spinal injuries attracts a wide and diverse range of research activities, often international.

There are opportunities for both clinical and academic research within the service.

The BSU is co-located with BAIL (Burwood Academy of Independent Living) which facilitates and coordinates research activity related to rehabilitation.

SMO / Staff Support

There is a consultant and/or registrar onsite during normal work hours to provide support and advice.

All out of hours activity is covered with the support of a consultant on call. Out of hours, the BSU provides 24 hour acute cover to both the BSU and for acute admission to Christchurch Hospital, as well as acute advice to other hospitals in the region.

Registrars participate in the BSU roster, with the support of the Consultant on call. House officers participate in the Burwood-wide house officer out of hours roster.

Advantages to training at Burwood Spinal Unit, Canterbury District Health Board

The BSU is an internationally recognised spinal management service.

The BSU is located on the Burwood Hospital campus. It is situated in an attractive, park like setting. Due to the size of the campus, it is friendly and trainees can access a range of opportunities in this environment.

Trainees are encouraged to take up learning opportunities as much as possible. There is a dedicated office for both house surgeons (within the nursing station) and registrars (within the administration area) to undertake duties in a quiet environment.

There is a resource centre located onsite, which provides library services and facilities for staff and patients. It is situated in pleasant surroundings offering on-line medical library services, as well as books for learning from the medical library and personal reading.

In addition to this, there are pool facilities with scheduled hours for staff access.

Enquiries

Dr Raj Singhal, Clinical Director 
Email: Raj.Singhal@cdhb.health.nz 
Phone: (+64 3) 383 6850

Canterbury Health Laboratories (CHL)

Welcome

Thank you for taking the time to consider the possibility of training as a Specialist Pathologist in Christchurch, New Zealand. Canterbury Health Laboratories (CHL) has a longstanding history of successfully training registrars in all areas of Pathology.

We would love to have you visit the laboratory and have a first-hand experience of our departments. Feel free to make an appointment and we will show you around.

Why specialise in Laboratory Testing?

Operating from modern well equipped facilities opposite Christchurch Hospital, CHL provides laboratory services to general practice surgeries throughout the Canterbury District Health Board (CDHB), provides a level 6 tertiary care laboratory service for CDHB’s hospitals and performs reference tests for all medical diagnostic laboratories within New Zealand.

CHL offers specialist clinical and medico-legal tests, and has significant experience in providing laboratory testing services to both primary and secondary care settings.

Further to this, CHL runs an extensive routine automated laboratory service, with a long history of collaborative relationships over specialist testing. This includes involvement in contracts for the Newborn Metabolic Screening Program, Quality Improvements for Antenatal Downs Screening and Other Conditions, the National Cervical Screening Programme and acting as the WHO National Measles reference laboratory. Daily requests are received to perform specialist tests from laboratories and workplaces throughout New Zealand, using an established national courier network which uplifts specimens at the end of each working day.

CHL has a highly skilled workforce of dedicated staff with close links to many clinical professionals in various speciality areas throughout New Zealand.

It is the combination of all of these provided services that ensure CHL has the biggest ‘catchment’ area of any medical laboratory in New Zealand.

Career Prospects

Canterbury Health Laboratories is one of the largest laboratories in New Zealand, and has links to laboratories, and specialist related bodies internationally.

CHL delivers core medical diagnostic services, as well as a diverse range of specialist testing disciplines.

More than 2000 different types of tests are conducted at Canterbury Health Laboratories. Blood tests to biopsies, smears and genetic testing are all part of the service. On average CHL process over 2500 patient requests a day - of all kinds of bodily fluids including sputum, faeces, blood, urine and semen. In many instances CHL are the only laboratory in New Zealand conducting particular testing, and performs a range of testing that puts it on a world class footing.

CHL aims to be the first laboratory in New Zealand to deliver new tests and technology advances that can have the on flow effect of improving patient care.

New Fellows are presently experiencing a relative ease in securing consultant posts soon after completing their FRCPA either in New Zealand or in Australia.

National Contracts

Canterbury Health Laboratories holds several National Health Contracts including the following:

  • National Screening Unit (Ministry of Health)
  • National Cervical Screening Programme
  • Quality Improvements for Ante Natal Downs and Other Conditions

World Health Organisation

New Zealand National Measles Reference Laboratory

Most common private services offered include:

  • Immigration Medicals
  • Occupational Screening
  • Workplace Drug Testing
  • Wellness Tests (staff cholesterol, glucose checks etc)

Medical Staff in our Service

A wide range of people of different backgrounds and skill sets are employed at CHL, encompassing:

  • Specialist Pathologists
  • Medical Laboratory Technicians
  • Registrars
  • Phlebotomists
  • Medical Laboratory Scientists
  • Scientific Officers
  • Support and Administration Staff

All about our service

Canterbury Health Laboratories has been involved in medical diagnostic testing for research purposes for many years. The laboratories work closely with clinical staff from DHBs and private laboratories throughout New Zealand to design research and set up new testing practices. Staff are actively involved in the development of new testing practices, and attend conferences and meetings in their disciplines to encourage progression of technology in medical diagnostic science.

A dedicated research studies team work between the laboratory staff, and private organisations wanting to develop clinical studies to test the benefits of various treatment options or discover new links for biological markers and disease. Laboratory staff also have close ties with Otago University Christchurch School of Medicine, and other major research tertiary institutions in New Zealand. Laboratory staff tender for new screening or testing initiatives developed by the Ministry of Health, and work with ESR, and community health bodies to monitor the flow of disease throughout New Zealand.

Training in our service

The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Pathologists (RCPA) defines the training requirements and sets the examinations for Fellowship of the College. This is the principal post-graduate qualification in pathology in Australasia and it is automatically recognised in Australia and New Zealand. Full details of the regulations governing training are available from the College website: www.rcpa.edu.au

The pre-requisite to becoming a clinical pathologist is generally a year or two spent as an RMO before commencing training as a registrar. The minimum training time is five years in at least two laboratories accredited by the RCPA for registrar training positions.

Trainees have consultant supervisors who have direct responsibility for the progress and judgment of the trainee’s capabilities. Individual face-to-face supervision of at least one hour per week provides a forum for detailed discussion of clinical and theoretical issues. Part-time training is accepted under exceptional circumstances.

Christchurch has a well-established specialist training programme in all fields. The Training Programme is integrated with the clinical services provided by Canterbury District Health Board (www.cdhb.govt.nz) with academic input from the Department of Pathology of the University of Otago, Christchurch (www.otago.ac.nz) and is focused around Trainees gaining the qualification of FRCPA (Fellowship of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Pathologists).

Research

Research is an important part of specialist pathologist training. Trainees in Christchurch are encouraged to become involved in at least one research project at some point in the Programme. Even for those with no long-term interest in research, involvement in a project will increase awareness of the strengths and limitations in different research methodology and enable more critical reading of the literature. Subject to appropriate supervision and ethical approval, research may be undertaken at any time and in any setting, and involve any topic of interest. It is usually easier for trainees to become involved with pre-existing projects, but new ideas and new projects are actively encouraged.

SMO / Staff Support

The level of commitment to maintaining and improving our Training Programme is high. Despite Consultants’ busy work load, trainees are well supported and seldom have difficulty getting their training needs met. Registrars typically feel very much part of the team.

Advantages to training at Canterbury Health Laboratories, Canterbury District Health Board Working for Canterbury Health Laboratories, means working for one of the largest laboratories in New Zealand, as well as working with the largest employer in the South Island, and one of the biggest District Health Boards in New Zealand.

Our employees work a variety of shifts and rosters, from full-time to part-time, contract and casual. The work is challenging and varied in an environment that is strongly team oriented, and above all - highly supportive.

Working with Canterbury Health Laboratories will provide you with opportunities for career development and enhancement, and you will gain extensive experience in a variety of settings.

Enquiries

Physical Address:
Canterbury Health Laboratories
Cnr Tuam & Hagley Ave Opposite
Christchurch Hospital
Christchurch
New Zealand

Postal Address:
PO Box 151
Christchurch 8140
New Zealand

Within NZ phone:
0800 THE LAB (0800 843 522)
Phone: (+64 3) 364 0300
Fax: (+64 3) 364 0750
Email: info@chl.co.nz

Cardiology

The Department of Cardiology manages inpatient and outpatient care for the Canterbury Region providing a full range of advanced invasive procedures and cardiac surgery for a wider region.

Patients are referred to this service by General Practitioners, Emergency Department and other specialist services. The Department includes 2 cardiac catheterisation suites with angioplasty capability, a nine bed Coronary Care Unit and 2 Cardiology Wards. The Inpatient Service area is supported by one of the largest outpatient and rehabilitation services in New Zealand.

The Clinical Director of Cardiology is Dr John Lainchbury. The department employs 13 other senior cardiologists, 8 registrars and 5 house officers. This medical service forms part of a large multi-disciplinary team comprised of skilled nursing staff, physiotherapists, medical technicians, pharmacist, occupational therapist, social workers and secretarial personnel.

This is an extremely busy department with ongoing commitment to providing the best cardiac care to the people of Canterbury and offers a wide range of experiences to RMOs.

For further information:

Dr John Lainchbury, Clinical Director
Phone (+64 3) 364 8070
Email:
john.lainchbury@cdhb.govt.nz

Cardiothoracic Surgery

Welcome

To the information page for the Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery (CTS).

Why Cardiothoracic Surgery?

The practice of Cardiothoracic Surgery is a rewarding career choice.

Cardiothoracic surgery is a specialty which is around fifty years old – historically Cardiothoracic Surgeons are innovative and change adaptive. A trainee can gain an immense amount of professional and personal reward when fully engaged as a part of the cardiothoracic multi-disciplinary team which focuses on enhanced outcomes for our patients before and after surgery through education of patients to make positive changes which can impact on their lives.

The specialty is challenging and very busy; daily responsibilities comprising of a combination of ward work and in-patient review, major operative procedures, outpatient review, learning tutorials and academic / research opportunities are part of the daily routine here at Christchurch Hospital. The post-operative period provides the registrar with the opportunity to be involved in clinical decision making in the ICU setting an opportunity to apply your knowledge of physiology, pharmacology and pathology in the clinical setting.

Career Prospects

There are many reasons to be optimistic about the future of Cardiothoracic Surgery as a specialty. The Royal Australasian College of Surgeons (RACS) is the principal training body for the training and education of surgeons in Australia and New Zealand. Accreditation is given by the Australian Medical Council to RACS and standards for education and training are established by RACS.

The RACS Board of Cardiothoracic Surgery has oversight of the RACS Surgical Education and Training Program (SET) in Cardiothoracic Surgery. The SET Program in Cardiothoracic Surgery is designed to provide trainees with clinical operative experience in order to learn special methods of investigation and become competent in techniques related to the discipline. At the conclusion of the SET Program it is expected the trainee will be able to perform as an independent practitioner who meets the requirements of all identified RACS competencies.

You will need clinical experience and academic achievements to progress. Christchurch CTS has an excellent record of paper publication and presentation at national and international meetings, and provides a supportive working environment to facilitate progression. 

Staff

Christchurch CTS is a small unit providing a comprehensive service. The unit comprises; 3 SMO, 1 SET trainee, 3 registrar and 1 HO. All members of the surgical team are encouraged to participate in the opportunities that the CTS service presents. On call duties are likely to involve night cover of surgical specialties to achieve a compliant roster.

The team is assisted by Senior Clinical Nurses. At present, Ward 10 is the Vascular and Cardiothoracic ward, and is staffed by nurses with expertise in vascular and cardiothoracic surgery. There is a Charge Nurse Manager and a Clinical Nurse Specialist on the ward.

Contact

For more information or general enquiries about RMO positions in the CTS please contact:

Graham McCrystal, Clinical Director
Tel: 03 364 0640

Or email
Graham.McCrystal@cdhb.health.nz.

Clinical Pharmacology

Welcome

Christchurch is the leading site for Training in Clinical Pharmacology in New Zealand.

Why specialise in Clinical Pharmacology?

Clinical Pharmacology is the scientific discipline that involves all aspects of the relationship between drugs and humans. Drugs are the main therapeutic tools of physicians and hence clinical pharmacology is a core skill for all physicians. Formal training in clinical pharmacology encompasses all aspects of safe, effective and rational use of medicines applied at individual, group and population levels.

Clinical pharmacologists work toward rational, evidence-based, cost-effective use of drugs in four domains:

1      Clinical medicine: clinical consultation, clinical toxicology, therapeutic drug monitoring, pharmacogenetics and, often, hospital practice in a second specialty

2      Policy and governance: including drug regulation, serving on national and local committees

3      Research: both within the discipline and in supporting and advising other disciplines on research related to medicines

4      Education: undergraduate and post-graduate.

Advanced Training in Clinical Pharmacology is well suited to dual training. Research is integral to the discipline and a research degree is supported as part of Advanced Training in Clinical Pharmacology. 

Career Prospects

There are currently shortages of Clinical Pharmacologists worldwide, including Australia and NZ. Appointments are often joint appointments to the Hospital and University. Clinical Pharmacologists are employed by other organisations such as Government and the pharmaceutical industry.

Medical Staff in our Service

The service has five clinical pharmacologists: Prof Murray Barclay, A/Prof Matt Doogue, Dr Paul Chin, Dr Matthew Strother (Oncology) and Emeritus Prof Evan Begg. There two advanced training registrars in the servcie.

All about our service

We provide tertiary services in the CDHB and academic services in the University of Otago - Christchurch. Within the CDHB services include: Medicines Information, Medicines Utilisation Review, Therapeutic Drug Monitoring and Clinical Consultation. We are responsible for clinical resources including Preferred Medicines List, Antimicrobial Guidelines, Clinical Pharmacology Guidelines and Patient Information Leaflets (for NZ). Medicines governance is overseen by the Medicines Advisory Committee and implemented by subcommittees and working groups. Currently the implementation and ongoing development of the electronic medicines systems is a major focus of the department.

Within the University we coordinate and teach the undergraduate course in Clinical Pharmacology, mainly to 5th and 6th year medical students. Staff are encouraged to undertake higher degrees (Masters, PhDs). The department is research active in several high quality research collaborations.

The registrar participates in all department activities and the role is tailored to the needs of individidual trainees.

Training in our service

The department is fully accredited for full time core training in Clinical Pharmacology. All the trainee activities are directly aligned to the RACP curriculum. There are educational, research and productivity related meetings each week, in which all staff actively participate.

Research

Research is a high priority of the department, through our University alignment. It is focussed on improving prescribing through drug and dose-individualisation. Particular areas of interest include adverse drug reactions, antibiotic dosing and clinical decision support. The Department produces an average of 10-15 publications per year. Registrars are expected to complete at least one research project per training year and are supported to present their research projects at national and international conferences, and to publish in international journals.

SMO / Staff Support

Our registrars have their own work spaces and work closely with the SMOs. The position is training focused and registrars are encouraged and supported to attend Australasian training meetings as well as use local training opportunities. Trainee intitiatives are supported and encouraged.

Advantages to training in Clinical Pharmacology, at Canterbury District Health Board

We are one of the leading Clinical Pharmacology centres in Australasia. Currently, A/Prof Matt Doogue Chairs the RACP Specialty Training Committee in Clinical Pharmacology.

Enquiries

A/Prof Matt Doogue – director of training

matt.doogue@cdhb.health.ac.nz, +64 22 406 3735

Prof Murray Barclay – clinical director

murray.barclay@cdhb.health.ac.nz

Community and Public Health

Welcome

Health begins where people work, live, learn and play. Welcome to Community and Public Health - the part of CDHB that keeps people out of the health care system.

Why specialise in public health?

Public health has been defined as “the science and art of preventing disease, prolonging life, and promoting health through the organised efforts of society”.

Public health medicine mostly doesn’t involve patient care; it’s about the many things we can do as a community to keep people healthy - from things like preventing the spread of measles to making the healthy choice the easy choice for children in schools to developing regional alcohol harm reduction strategies.

Career Prospects

Public health physicians are employed in a wide range of organisations, including District Health Board public health services (like C&PH) and planning and funding divisions, universities, government departments and non-government organisations.

Medical Staff in our Service

The Public Health Specialist Team at C&PH consists of six public health physicians and one non-medical public health specialist who provide professional leadership and are responsible for the professional quality of work at C&PH.

Three public health physicians are designated as Medical Officers of Health, and have regulatory powers and responsibilities under the Health Act 1956 and other public health legislation.

Public Health Medicine Registrars are also members of the Public Health Specialist Team. Registrars are expected to contribute to a wide range of C&PH service work, as well as completing formal projects. Currently CPH has one registrar position. Registrars are appointed via the NZCPHM Training Programme.

All about our service

C&PH is a regional public health service for Canterbury, South Canterbury and the West Coast. In Christchurch we have four teams, focusing on health protection (communicable disease control, environmental health, alcohol regulation), public health information, health in all policies, and community engagement. We have district offices in Timaru and Greymouth. A public health specialist provides the professional lead for each team.

Earthquake response and recovery has been a major focus of Christchurch work since September 2010. We are also working with the other two public health services in Dunedin and Nelson towards alignment of public health services across the South Island.

Our Christchurch office is at 310 Manchester St, at the edge of Christchurch’s Central Business District.

Training in our service

Training in public health medicine is organised by the NZCPHM Training Programme - all C&PH registrars must be part of the Training Programme. Registrars are expected to contribute to a mix of service and project work. Training days are organised by the national Training Programme throughout the year. Registrars are also supported to attend conferences and in-house training.

Research

We collaborate with community researchers on diverse topics. One of our public health specialists is also employed part time by the University of Otago, Christchurch and all members of our public health specialist team contribute to undergraduate medical student teaching in public health.

SMO / Staff Support

One of our public health specialist team acts as workplace supervisor for registrars, with other specialists offering training during rotations to their teams. Registrars attend specialist team meetings, and work closely with other public health staff. Registrars are not on call after hours.

Advantages to training at Community and Public Health, Canterbury District Health Board

C&PH has an excellent team of supportive medical and non-medical staff. The Canterbury earthquakes have provided our community with a greater understanding of what public health contributes, alongside enormous opportunities to make a difference to the things that influence our community’s health into the future.

Enquiries

Dr Cheryl Brunton, Registrar Workplace Supervisor, Community and Public Health>
Email: cheryl.brunton@cdhb.health.nz

How to Apply

Applications for public health training are dealt with by the NZ College of Public Health Medicine. The NZCPHM website is very informative and clearly sets out the application and selection process. For successful candidates the first part of training is in an academic setting where registrars complete a MPH degree as their part one of training. After part one there is usually a period in a DHB public health unit followed by other placements. Training finishes with passing a final exam at the end of the four year programme. The training programme for registrars is coordinated by the national College office. 

Dental

The staff of the Dental Service includes all the dental specialists and for more complex cases a multidisciplinary approach is used. Patient eligibility is determined by the Canterbury District Health Board and a wide variety of treatments are provided.

For further information:
Lester Settle, Clinical Director
Phone (+64 3) 364 0250
Email: Lester.Settle@cdhb.govt.nz

Emergency Medicine

Christchurch Hospital's Emergency Department is a busy department, seeing in excess of 97,000 patients per year. The department deals with the full range of medical and surgical problems and is the tertiary referral centre for trauma in the region. The acuity level of patients seen in this Department is fairly high, with an admission rate of over 42%. Patients may self-refer, be transferred by St John Ambulance or Police, or by their General Practitioner.

The Emergency department has a team of 18 Consultants (a mix of full and part time), Fellows, 24 Registrars and 12 second year or above House Officers. In addition, there are 2 first year house officers. There is a dedicated team of senior nursing staff who provide specialized nursing care, including  triage of all patients entering the system.

There is a regular continuing education programme for the medical staff, held for 3 hours every Friday morning, including registrar teaching. The Department is accredited for advanced training in Emergency Medicine by the Australasian College for Emergency Medicine (ACEM) for two years. Current training rotations include ICU, anaesthesia, paediatrics, general medicine (often cardiology) and acute orthopaedics.

For further information:
Dr David Richards, Clinical Director
Phone (+64 3) 364 0270, extension 80287
Email: scott.pearson@cdhb.health.nz
or telephone the Departmental Secretary on +64 (0)3 364 0270, extension 89614

Endocrinology and Diabetes

The Christchurch Endocrinology and Diabetes Service has three positions accredited by the Royal Australasian College of Physicians for advanced training in Endocrinology and Diabetes. Two of the positions are for training specifically in diabetes and the other in general endocrinology.

Christchurch has long been a centre of excellence for endocrinology training.

The general Endocrinology Department is based within Christchurch Hospital and has close links with other specialty departments including neurosurgery where pituitary surgery is undertaken, endocrine surgery and radiology. The Endocrinology Service is supported by an excellent specialist laboratory (Endolab) which maintains close clinical links.

The Diabetes Service is housed in a recently purpose-built building overlooking Hagley Park and a very short distance from the hospital. In addition to the clinic rooms and offices, there is a large seminar room / patient education area complete with demonstration kitchen. Diabetes Christchurch, the local branch of Diabetes New Zealand, is also housed in the same building.

The consultants staffing the general endocrinology service are Dr Tom Cawood, Dr David Cole, Dr Catherine Conway, Dr Belinda Schouten, Dr Penny Hunt and Dr Steven Soule.

The consultants working in the Diabetes Centre are Dr Juliet Berkeley (Clinical Director of Endocrinology and Diabetes), Dr David Cole, Dr Catherine Conway, Dr Chris Florkowski, Dr Helen Lunt, Dr Peter Moore, Prof. Russell Scott and Dr Steven Soule. Most, but not all of the consultants also do some general medicine duties. Drs Cole and Moore have an obstetric medicine interest. Prof. Scott runs the Lipid Disorders Service and Dr Florkowski is based in the Clinical Biochemistry Department and Canterbury Health Labs.

For further information:

Dr Juliet Berkeley, Clinical Director 

Phone (+64 3) 364 8306
Email: juliet.berkeley@cdhb.govt.nz

Gastroenterology Department

Welcome

Thank you for looking at the Christchurch Hospital Gastroenterology career page. We are of the biggest gastroenterology units in New Zealand serving a population of 500,000 and have a well established and successful training programme in gastroenterology.

Why specialise in Gastroenterology?

Gastroenterology is an exciting and popular career choice. It combines the physician’s approach of careful clinical assessment with a wide range of procedures and therapeutic interventions. Gastroenterology covers a huge field which includes disorder of the oesophagus, stomach, intestine, liver, pancreas and nutrition. There is a wide age range of patients. Care is delivered in a range of settings from acute emergency hospital based care through to a large number of day and outpatients. A career in gastroenterology offers good opportunities to sub-specialise in an area of interest, to develop research and teaching programmes and also is very amenable to part time practice. In addition to full specialty training, a 3-4 month clinical attachment in gastroenterology as a house officer or junior registrar is excellent experience for any medical career.

Career Prospects

Career prospects have never been better for gastroenterologists. There are many current vacancies in New Zealand both for full and part time gastroenterologists. With the increase in inflammatory bowel disease, liver problems and the planned national roll out of the Bowel Cancer Screening Programme it is anticipated that the number of gastroenterologists required in New Zealand could increase by between 50-100% over the next 10-20 years. As well as a full training programme, we also offer short (3-4 month) attachments for House Officers and Junior Registrars which are invaluable for subsequent careers as general practitioners or general physicians. An initial short attachment is also an excellent way to see if gastroenterology may be the career for you.

Medical Staff in our Service

The service has nine gastroenterologists (senior medical officers or SMOs), four of whom are full time. The SMOs have an excellent skill mix and sub-speciality interests. There are three registrar positions. Two of these registrars are advanced training appointments (ie post FRACP part 1) and one is a rotating position (four month attachment). We have one house surgeon position with attachments of three months. Currently there are two research fellows.

All about our service

We are a large busy service servicing a local population of approximately 500,000 people and providing tertiary services to the rest of the South Island.

Our inpatient service is divided into three consultant teams each with an assigned registrar. The inpatient load varies, generally between 2-8 patients per team and the main inpatient conditions are severe inflammatory bowel disease, liver disease, cancer or gastrointestinal bleeding.

Registrars cover acute admissions, inpatient consults and general practitioner enquires during the day on a 1 in 3 roster (after hours cover for the service is on a medical specialities roster that the gastroenterology registrars participate in). Registrars attend their consultant’s outpatient clinics (2 or 3 per week) and see a full range of ambulatory gastroenterology conditions under supervision. The service performs 7-8,000 endoscopic procedures a year incorporating the full range of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures (gastroscopy, colonoscopy, enteroscopy, ERCP, endoscopic ultrasound).

Advanced trainees are trained in gastroscopy and colonoscopy and gain experience in more advanced endoscopy according to stage and progress. The rotating registrar may also gain experience in gastroscopy during their four month attachment if they wish and are post FRAP part 1. Gastroenterology also offers manomety, capsule endoscopy, nurse lead specialist clinics (hepatitis, inflammatory bowel disease, gastrostomy). Trainees gain experience with all these services in a structured way.

The House Officer primarily provides cover for the inpatient but also attends two outpatient clinics per week and gains wide experience in the management of both in and outpatient gastroenterology conditions.

SMO support

Our registrars and house officer are well supported by the SMOs. There is good cover provided by the consultants (four of whom are full time) and there is an acute consultant available 24 hours a day. All clinical and procedural training is closely supervised. We provide regular feedback and review of the training programme according to progress and need. There is a designated training coordinator to offer guidance and mentorship.

Research

The gastroenterology unit at Christchurch Hospital is the most academically and research active unit in New Zealand and is very well respected internationally. There are three SMOs with academic appointments and three other SMOs have PhDs. There is a range of clinical and basic research in the department and good opportunities to engage in projects that result in presentations and publications. This research experience has given our previous trainees an advantage when applying for consultant positions.

Training in our service and advantages of training in Christchurch

The gastroenterology department at Christchurch hospital has a long standing tradition and commitment to quality training in gastroenterology. We have trained many registrars who now have consultant posts both in New Zealand and overseas.

The reasons to choose Christchurch as a training post are:

  • Large unit with a large undifferentiated clinical load
  • A comprehensive clinical service with trainee exposure to all aspects
  • A well developed and successful training programme
  • A commitment to trainees for a quality training experience
  • An active research programme that all trainees take part in resulting in presentations at meetings and publications
  • Accredited for two years of full time training

Enquiries

Dr Michael Burt Clinical Director, Gastroenterology
Christchurch Hospital
Email: michael.burt@cdhb.govt.nz

Other useful contacts are:

Dr Teresa Chalmers-Watson
Director Advanced Training Programme
Email: teresa.chlamers-watson@cdhb.govt.nz

Dr Catherine Stedman, Assoc Prof Richard Gearry, Prof Murray Barclay
Research Programmes and Opportunities
Email: catherine.stedman@cdhb.govt.nz
Email: richard.gearry@cdhb.govt.nz
Email: murray.barclay@cdhb.govt.nz

Current SMO

Prof Murray Barclay
Dr Michael Burt
Dr Teresa Chalmers-Watson
Dr Bruce Chapman
Dr Steven Ding
Dr James Falvey
Assoc Prof Richard Gearry
Dr Gary Lim
Dr Alison Ross
Dr Catherine Stedman

General Surgery

Medical Staff in our Service

The General Surgery service currently employs 10 House Officers (including 8 x PGY1s and 2 x PGY2s), 19 Registrars (including 7 senior registrars), 4 Clinical Fellows and 19 Senior Medical Officers.

We offer training and non-training positions at the Registrar level.

The medical staff work in a team based structure with eight teams, each consisting of 2 x SMOs, 2 x Registrars and 1 x House Officer.  Each team covers acute and elective work, based on a four weekly rotating schedule.

All about our service

The General Surgery service is an acute and elective-based service with approximately 10000 admissions and 17000 outpatients visits per year.  We offer a range of clinical opportunities including operating theatre, pre-admission and outpatients clinics, endoscopy and a new trauma service, which is under development.  The service is predominantly based at Christchurch Hospital, but some services are also provided at Ashburton, St Georges and Southern Cross Hospitals.

Training – the General Surgery service is accredited with the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons (RACS), which provides a specific teaching programme for all Surgical Education Trainees (SET).  The CDHB and General Surgery service together with RACS have also signed a Memorandum of Understanding to uphold the Building Respect, Improving Patient Safety programme, which outlines our commitment to the provision of a collaborative and respectful working and learning environment for staff and trainees.

The Senior Medical Officers are also closely associated with the University Department of Surgery from the Otago School of Medicine, with Professor Frizelle as the academic Head of this University Department.

The CDHB and General Surgery service provide the following educational opportunities: regular Continuing Medical Education (CME), journal clubs, Mortality and Morbidity meetings, Multidisciplinary Team Meetings (MDT) - Breast and Endocrine, Colorectal, Hepatobiliary, and Upper GI.  These MDT meetings include colleagues from Radiology, Pathology and other clinical teams as appropriate such as Oncology and Palliative Care.

The multidisciplinary meetings are held with colleagues in Radiology, Pathology and other clinical teams as appropriate such as Oncology.

 Enquiries

For enquiries please contact Mr Grant Coulter, Clinical Director, General Surgery, Christchurch Hospital, via email Grant.Coulter@cdhb.health.nz

General Medicine

The Department of General Medicine deals with approximately 14,000 acute admissions per year. These are cared for by twelve acute medical teams, one discharging team and an acute stroke team, each with a group of consultants, a medical registrar, and a house officer. Trainee Interns and/or 5th year medical students from the Christchurch School of Medicine are often assigned to these teams. Two acute teams are on every 24 hours and thus the teams work a 1 in 6 roster.

Almost all the house officers and all the registrars do some defined sub-specialty work, including diabetes and some general medical clinics.  Most of the General Medicine consultants do sub-specialty work.

The Department of General Medicine interfaces with all Internal Medicine departments and is developing closer links with Primary Health Care and the Health Care of the Elderly.

General Medicine is an academic department with regular teaching, tutorials and presentations.  These provide excellent opportunities for learning and development.  There are also three Senior Medical Registrars who are available for supervision and teaching of procedural skills.

For further information:
Dr David Jardine, Clinical Director
Phone (+64 3) 378 6005
Email:
david.jardine@cdhb.health.nz

Haematology

Te Pūtahi Mātai Toto o Te Waipounamu

Welcome

The Christchurch Haematology Service is a tertiary centre for the South Island of New Zealand. We provide a comprehensive specialist service for patients with blood disorders which include bone marrow transplantation (both autologous and allogeneic) and treatment for haematological malignancies, bleeding and thrombotic disorders.

Career Prospects

Haematology is an area of medicine that is expected to continue growing and as such, there is a need for more specialists in this area.

Medical Staff in our Service

There are seven haematologists, five registrars (expected to increase to six during 2018) and a house officer.

All about our service

The service is comprised of:

  • Haematology Outpatients
  • Haematology Day Ward
  • South Island Bone Marrow Transplant Unit (BMTU)
  • Haemostasis Service

The service embodies a multidisciplinary team approach with close liaisons with diagnostic and support services and medical and surgical colleagues.

Visiting outpatient consultation services are provided to the Westcoast DHB.

Visiting laboratory services are provided to South Canterbury DHB. 

Training in our service

Haematology is accredited to train four Registrars. Teaching sessions are held regularly and registrars are encouraged to attend various multidisciplinary meetings.

Research

There is excellent access to the Haematology Service Research Unit - actively supported to join multi-centre trials. Assistance with ethics approval, nursing etc is provided by this group.

SMO / Staff Support

The senior staff pride themselves on their approachability and welcome opportunities to use difficult clinical situations as teaching opportunities. There is 24 hours SMO on-call availability.

Advantages to training at Haematology, Canterbury District Health Board

We have comprehensive training programmes in haematology. In addition, rotational positions for those seeking general experience are also available.

Enquiries

Dr Mark Smith Clinical Director
Phone: (+64 3) 364 0387
Email: mark.smith@cdhb.health.nz

Infectious Diseases Service

Welcome

Thank you for your interest in Infectious Diseases (ID) at Christchurch Hospital and the Canterbury District Health Board. Christchurch Hospital has a distinguished history of providing an excellent training programme linked to an active clinical department across the broad range of infectious diseases. It has been our pleasure to host trainees and encourage them in their career over many years.

Why specialise in Infectious Diseases?

The challenge of Infectious Diseases as a specialty is the breadth of conditions included in its scope. In addition to having particular expertise in patient groups such as HIV/AIDS, other immune compromised hosts, travel medicine, home delivery of antimicrobial therapy, treatment of severe bacterial sepsis and chronic viral infections (Hepatitis B and C) infectious diseases specialists interact and provide advice to all departments within the hospital. As infections are ubiquitous, training in Infectious Diseases provides important experience in many branches of internal medicine.

Career Prospects

While HIV is still important, the main specialty drivers are changing. New challenges such as the spread of multi-resistant organisms, antimicrobial stewardship, emerging pathogens and new treatments for Hepatitis C mean that there is ongoing need for well trained ID physicians. It is possible to become dually trained such as ID and Microbiology or ID and General Medicine.

Medical Staff in our Service

There are five Senior Medical staff members in the ID Department. Four are also General Physicians (Dr Alan Pithie, Dr Sarah Metcalf, Dr Simon Dalton and Dr Mark Birch) and one has a joint position with the Department of Pathology at the University of Otago, Christchurch (Professor Stephen Chambers). There are two Medical Registrars, one typically being an Advanced Trainee in ID and the second often being a Basic or Advanced Internal Medicine, who rotates through ID. Additionally, there are several speciality nurses attached to the department for Home Intravenous Antibiotics, HIV and Viral Hepatitis and Research.

All about our service

The Infectious Diseases service is primarily a consultative service. We visit all wards and departments within the hospital (other than paediatrics where there is a specialty ID Paediatrician). Important components of the work include skin and soft tissue infections, bone and joint infection, prosthetic device infection, respiratory infections, septicaemia and the immunocompromised host.

Weekly meetings include:

  • twice weekly Bone Marrow Transplant Unit rounds
  • weekly Radiology meeting
  • weekly Hepatitis C meeting(newly formed)
  • monthly Complex Orthopaedic Infection MDM

There are outpatient clinics weekly that includes a large HIV population, treatment and management of Hepatitis B and C and extrapulmonary TB. There are approximately 30 patients on home intravenous antibiotics at any one time. These are primarily bone and joint infections, septicaemias and device related infections.

In addition, the ID service provides telephone advice to other specialists and general practitioners in the region.

The Registrars do alternate weeks of:

  • ID consultations
  • ID consult follow-ups, outpatient clinics, liaising with the Home Intravenous service and urgent new outpatient referrals.

There is scope to be involved in projects and research.

Training in our service

There is a weekly structured registrar-led infectious disease teaching session that is done in conjunction with the microbiology trainees and designed to cover the syllabus given in the Australasian College of Physician training requirements. There is also a weekly journal club, patient review session, and regular morbidity mortality meeting and X-Ray meeting. Trainees are encouraged to attend and present at the annual Australasian Society of Infectious Diseases meeting. There may be opportunities to do the microbiology training requirements at the Canterbury Health Laboratories by arrangement.

SMO / Staff Support

Registrars are expected to provide initial consultation on the wards and see a broad range of outpatients. There will always be consultant review of cases with immediate access to consultants if needed. Consultant advice is available on a 24 hours 7 day a week basis.

Research

The Christchurch Hospital Infectious Diseases service has a strong research and publication record and trainees are expected to do some clinical research as part of their attachment of sufficient standard for publication and fulfilling training requirements. Many projects are done in collaboration with staff at Canterbury Health Laboratories and the Department of Pathology at University of Otago, Christchurch.

Advantages to training at Infectious Diseases, Canterbury District Health Board

Christchurch Hospital offers the broad scope of experience provided by a large tertiary referral centre that is well established and has close links with an excellent Microbiology Department and the academic excellence of the University of Otago. Our department fosters a supportive and collegial environment. This is on the context of a cohesive experienced team of supportive infectious disease specialists who have broad general medical and academic interests.

Enquiries

Dr Sarah Metcalf, Clinical Director, email sarah.metcalf@cdhb.health.nz

Intensive Care

Christchurch Hospital's Intensive Care Unit provides tertiary care for the greater South Island. Intensive Care is provided for a variety of patients, including: General Medical, General Surgical, Neurosurgical and Cardiothoracic Surgical and Spinal Injury patients. Intensive Care is provided for paediatric patients, although long term or complex paediatric intensive care patients are transferred to Starship Children’s Hospital Intensive Care Unit in Auckland.

The Department admits approximately 1350 patients a year, including 350 Cardiac Surgical and 75 Paediatric patients. Of the remaining adult admissions, over 90% are emergency medical or surgical admissions from wards, Operating Theatre, Recovery or Emergency Department. The Department also runs a 24/7 Air Retrieval sevice and a 24/7 combined Nursing and Medical Outreach Team within Christchurch Hospital. 

The Department is staffed by 7 full-time and 3 part-time Intensive Care Specialists, 2 Intensive Care Fellows, 18 Registrars including ICU trainees and trainees in Anaesthesia, Emergency Medicine, Physician and surgical programmes.

The Department runs 4 hours per week of Continuing Education and Quality Assurance, including a Journal Club, Medical Presentation, and Morbidity and Mortality meeting.  The Department runs 2 hours of Registrar teaching per week, plus one afternoon per month.

For further information:
Dr Seton Henderson, Clinical Director, ICU
Email: seton.henderson@cdhb.health.nz

Labs

Welcome

Thank you for taking the time to consider the possibility of training as a Specialist Pathologist in Christchurch, New Zealand. Canterbury Health Laboratories (CHL) has a longstanding history of successfully training registrars in all areas of Pathology.

We would love to have you visit the laboratory and have a first-hand experience of our departments. Feel free to make an appointment and we will show you around.

Why specialise in Laboratory Testing?

Operating from modern well equipped facilities opposite Christchurch Hospital, CHL provides laboratory services to general practice surgeries throughout the Canterbury District Health Board (CDHB), provides a level 6 tertiary care laboratory service for CDHB’s hospitals and performs reference tests for all medical diagnostic laboratories within New Zealand.

CHL offers specialist clinical and medico-legal tests, and has significant experience in providing laboratory testing services to both primary and secondary care settings.

Further to this, CHL runs an extensive routine automated laboratory service, with a long history of collaborative relationships over specialist testing. This includes involvement in contracts for the Newborn Metabolic Screening Program, Quality Improvements for Antenatal Downs Screening and Other Conditions, the National Cervical Screening Programme and acting as the WHO National Measles reference laboratory. Daily requests are received to perform specialist tests from laboratories and workplaces throughout New Zealand, using an established national courier network which uplifts specimens at the end of each working day.

CHL has a highly skilled workforce of dedicated staff with close links to many clinical professionals in various speciality areas throughout New Zealand.

It is the combination of all of these provided services that ensure CHL has the biggest ‘catchment’ area of any medical laboratory in New Zealand.

Career Prospects

Canterbury Health Laboratories is one of the largest laboratories in New Zealand, and has links to laboratories, and specialist related bodies internationally.

CHL delivers core medical diagnostic services, as well as a diverse range of specialist testing disciplines.

More than 3000 different types of tests are conducted at Canterbury Health Laboratories. Blood tests to biopsies, smears and genetic testing are all part of the service. On average CHL process over 2500 patient requests a day - of all kinds of bodily fluids including sputum, faeces, blood, urine and semen. There are instances when CHL is the only laboratory in New Zealand conducting particular testing, and perform a range of testing that puts it on a world class footing.

CHL aims to be the first laboratory in New Zealand to deliver new tests and technology advances that can have the on flow effect of improving patient care.

National Contracts

Canterbury Health Laboratories holds several National Health Contracts including the following:

  • National Screening Unit (Ministry of Health)
  • National Cervical Screening Programme
  • Quality Improvements for Ante Natal Downs and Other Conditions

World Health Organisation

New Zealand National Measles Reference Laboratory

Most common private services offered include:

  • Immigration Medicals
  • Occupational Screening
  • Workplace Drug Testing
  • Wellness Tests (staff cholesterol, glucose checks etc)

Medical Staff in our Service

A wide range of people of different backgrounds and skill sets are employed at CHL, encompassing:

  • Specialist Pathologists
  • Medical Laboratory Technicians
  • Registrars
  • Phlebotomists
  • Medical Laboratory Scientists
  • Scientific Officers
  • Support and Administration Staff

All about our service

Canterbury Health Laboratories has been involved in medical diagnostic testing for research purposes for many years. The laboratories work closely with clinical staff from DHBs and private laboratories throughout New Zealand to design research and set up new testing practices. Staff are actively involved in the development of new testing practices, and attend conferences and meetings in their disciplines to encourage progression of technology in medical diagnostic science.

A dedicated research studies team work between the laboratory staff, and private organisations wanting to develop clinical studies to test the benefits of various treatment options or discover new links for biological markers and disease. Laboratory staff also have close ties with Otago University Christchurch School of Medicine, and other major research tertiary institutions in New Zealand. Laboratory staff tender for new screening or testing initiatives developed by the Ministry of Health, and work with ESR, and community health bodies to monitor the flow of disease throughout New Zealand.

Training in our service

The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Pathologists (RCPA) defines the training requirements and sets the examinations for Fellowship of the College. This is the principal post-graduate qualification in pathology in Australasia and it is automatically recognised in Australia and New Zealand. Full details of the regulations governing training are available from the College website: www.rcpa.edu.au

The pre-requisite to becoming a clinical pathologist is generally a year or two spent as an RMO before commencing training as a registrar. The minimum training time is five years in at least two laboratories accredited by the RCPA for registrar training positions.

Trainees have consultant supervisors who have direct responsibility for the progress and judgment of the trainee’s capabilities. Individual face-to-face supervision of at least one hour per week provides a forum for detailed discussion of clinical and theoretical issues. Part-time training is accepted under exceptional circumstances.

Christchurch has a well-established specialist training programme in all fields. The Training Programme is integrated with the clinical services provided by Canterbury District Health Board (www.cdhb.health.nz) with academic input from the Department of Pathology of the University of Otago, Christchurch (www.otago.ac.nz) and is focused around Trainees gaining the qualification of FRCPA (Fellowship of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Pathologists).

Research

Research is an important part of specialist pathologist training. Trainees in Christchurch are encouraged to become involved in at least one research project at some point in the Programme. Even for those with no long-term interest in research, involvement in a project will increase awareness of the strengths and limitations in different research methodology and enable more critical reading of the literature. Subject to appropriate supervision and ethical approval, research may be undertaken at any time and in any setting, and involve any topic of interest. It is usually easier for trainees to become involved with pre-existing projects, but new ideas and new projects are actively encouraged.

SMO / Staff Support

The level of commitment to maintaining and improving our Training Programme is high. Despite Consultants’ busy work load, trainees are well supported and seldom have difficulty getting their training needs met. Registrars typically feel very much part of the team.

Advantages to training at Canterbury Health Laboratories, Canterbury District Health Board Working for Canterbury Health Laboratories, means working for one of the largest laboratories in New Zealand, as well as working with the largest employer in the South Island, and one of the biggest District Health Boards in New Zealand.

Our employees work a variety of shifts and rosters, from full-time to part-time, contract and casual. The work is challenging and varied in an environment that is strongly team oriented, and above all - highly supportive.

Working with Canterbury Health Laboratories will provide you with opportunities for career development and enhancement, and you will gain extensive experience in a variety of settings.

Enquiries

Physical Address:
Canterbury Health Laboratories
Cnr Tuam & Hagley Ave Opposite
Christchurch Hospital
Christchurch
New Zealand

Postal Address:
PO Box 151
Christchurch 8140
New Zealand

Within NZ phone:
0800 THE LAB (0800 843 522)
Phone: (+64 3) 364 0300
Fax: (+64 3) 364 0750
Email: info@chl.co.nz

www.chl.co.nz

Microbiology

Welcome

The Microbiology Service is a patient focused service providing expert guidance and support to clinicians for diagnosis and treatment of infections.The service has close links with the Infectious Diseases department, Public health and the Infection Control service.

Research

The Department of Microbiology is regularly involved in research. The projects can be laboratory based or involve clinical subjects through collaboration with our clinical colleagues. Depending on the nature and size of the project, applications for ethics and funding will be required through various organisations.

Training in our Service

There are weekly educational sessions taken by a Microbiologist, as well as journal clubs. There is a monthly laboratory professional development meeting where various interesting topics are presented. There are also weekly joint teaching sessions with the Infectious Diseases team.

The Microbiology registrar position is an accredited training post for the Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia as well as fulfilling the Royal Australasian College of Physicians Infectious Diseases training requirement. There are two positions available and the registrars alternate on a weekly basis for clinical duties. The other registrar will be focusing on research projects and self-directed learning.

SMO/Staff Support

There is a Microbiologist rostered on for backup as a support to registrars. This is for both normal working hours and after hours. The registrar is on the same after hour on-call roster as the consultants but always has consultant backup. There are also senior scientists available in the lab for consultation.

Advantages to Training in Microbiology at the CDHB

This is a well-supported registrar position, which will suit all levels of experience. There is dedicated time for research and self-directed learning.

It is a tertiary level laboratory, offering an extensive range of diagnostic services and therefore provides a comprehensive training experience. There is also a very close working relationship with the Infectious Diseases team, which adds significantly to the training experience.

Nephrology Service

All about our service

The Department of Nephrology provides a full range of nephrology services for the people of Canterbury and consultative general nephrology services for the people of the West Coast. In addition to this, it provides dialysis and transplant services for West Coast DHB and a kidney transplant service for Otago and Southland.

Services provided include diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation of patients with all forms of kidney disease, provision of inpatient, outpatient and day patient nephrology services and operation of the Home Dialysis Training Centre and Acute Dialysis Unit. Provision (together with the Department of Surgery) of deceased and live donor kidney transplant services is also provided for Canterbury, West Coast, Otago and Southland.

Enquiries

Interested candidates can contact Dr John Irvine, Clinical Director, phone (+64 3) 364 0655, ext 89525, or email john.irvine@cdhb.health.nz

Neurology 

Welcome

Welcome to the Department of Neurology, Christchurch Hospital. We are sure you will find it both an educational and enjoyable place to work.

Why specialise in Neurology?

Neurology involves the diagnosis and management of patients with disorders of the brain and nervous system, including muscle. It provides a stimulating career with an enormous variety and the opportunity to make use of both the fundamentals of clinical skills in history and examination and the latest in technological advances in diagnostics and treatments to make a difference in people’s lives. Neurology is a rapidly evolving field with a strong emphasis on basic and clinical research.

Career Prospects

There is currently a shortage of neurologists in New Zealand with demand for neurological services increasing in New Zealand and internationally. Career prospects for trainees are excellent. Most neurologists in New Zealand have a specialist practice in general neurology. There is opportunity and encouragement for further subspecialty training also. Combined training with general medicine and neurology is possible and is a highly sought-after skill mix in Provincial centres. Neurology is desirable in General Medicine and Geriatric Medicine training also.

Medical Staff in our Service

We have 7Neurologists, 3 Registrars and 1.5 House Officers.

All about our service

We provide inpatient and outpatient Neurological services for people within the Canterbury District Health Board region and tertiary-level services for adjacent DHBs. Inpatient services are based in ward 28, which is shared with the Department of Neurosurgery. An acute outpatient clinic operates from consulting rooms adjoining the ward. Non-acute outpatients take place at the Van der Veer Neurology Clinics at 40 Stewart Street, near the main hospital campus. Neurophysiology (EEG, nerve conduction, EMG) is on the Neurology/Neurosurgery floor.

Registrars appointed to the service rotate between the “acute” and “ward” and "consult" registrar positions. The acute registrar responds to new referrals from GPs , Emergency Department and attends the neurology rapid response clinics. The consult registrar performs inpatient ward consultations and sees new patients at the neurology outpatient clinics. The acute and consult registrars are supervised by the acute neurologist for the week. The ward registrar supervises the ward House Officer and the day-to-day care of neurology inpatients, and works closely with the neurology ward consultant. 

Training in our service

Training is a fundamental part of our service. RMOs enjoy good access to consultant staff for supervision. We have a weekly journal-club meeting which incorporates neurophysiology review sessions. We have a weekly combined clinical education meeting with the neurosurgery service and weekly neuroradiology review. Advanced trainees in neurology have the opportunity to perform nerve conduction studies / EMG and report EEG to meet their training requirements.

Research

The department is frequently involved in clinical research, for example in M.S., P.D. and Stroke. Registrars are encouraged to take part in research projects that will help them to fulfil their training requirements and/or lead to journal publications.

SMO / Staff

Support Neurology SMOs are rostered to enable ease of access for supervision of junior staff. The acute neurologist is available immediately by cell-phone at all times, including after-hours. The ward neurologist performs two full ward-rounds each week and is available to review new admissions to the service and others as required every work day.

Advantages to training in Neurology, Canterbury District Health Board

Christchurch has the second largest neurology service in New Zealand and provides an excellent living, working, and training environment. Advanced trainees in Neurology will have the opportunity to complement their Christchurch training with posts to other centres in NZ or Australia also, through the neurology “match” scheme.

Enquiries

Dr John N Fink Clinical Director
Phone: (+64 3) 364 0940
Email: john.fink@cdhb.health.nz

Neurosurgery

Welcome

Thank you for your enquiry about Neurosurgery and especially about our Neurosurgical Unit here in Christchurch.

Why specialise in Neurosurgery?

Neurosurgery (also called Neurological Surgery) is the treatment (both non-operative and operative) of diseases and conditions (congenital and acquired) of the nervous system - the brain, pituitary gland, spinal cord and peripheral nerves, and their coverings. The coverings include the meninges, the skull, the vertebrae and the overlying soft tissues of the scalp, muscle, subcutaneous layers and skin. Patients of all ages with such conditions are treated by neurosurgeons.

Operations on the skull and brain date back for thousands of years, but it was not until the early part of the 20th century that the subspecialty of neurosurgery and specialist neurosurgeons evolved and there has been further evolution with the development of specific subspecialties within neurosurgery. Of all surgical specialties, Neurosurgery deals with the widest range of ages (from in utero and the premature baby to the very elderly, the widest range of pathological conditions, has the largest percentage of benign tumours and the widest range of surgical techniques including the most delicate microsurgery. In addition, the applied functional anatomy and physiology - form and function - especially together with advances in modern neuro-imaging, make it a very intellectually stimulating specialty with great scope for research and one which can offer immense benefits to patients. Neurosurgery can be a very satisfying and rewarding career.

Career Prospects

There is a relative shortage of neurosurgeons in Australia and New Zealand and there is also an ageing neurosurgical workforce in both countries and so succession planning is vital. It is important that we attract and train neurosurgeons who wish to practice neurosurgery in New Zealand and in our world class public health system and in conjunction with a private practice if wished.

All about our service

The Department of Neurosurgery is based at Christchurch Hospital and cares for both adult and paediatric patients. Adult neurosurgical patients are cared for in Ward 28, the Neurosciences ward, together with neurological patients. Paediatric cases are cared for in the three paediatric wards, including CHOC (Children's Oncology Cancer Centre). Neurosurgery is very well supported by a full range of other surgical and medical specialties and has ready access to modern imaging (including CT, MRI, U/S, DSA). Christchurch Hospital has a well-established PACS system for accessing all imaging. We also are well supported by and work closely with the Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering and together produce surgical equipment and implants - specifically custom-built cranial prostheses/plates both for use here and also in other centres in Australia and New Zealand. In the 2015/2016 year, the Service saw 660 new and 1551 follow-up outpatients, had 1273 admissions of which 177 were children, and performed 743 operations, of which 2.0% comprised acute cranial trauma and the greater proportion were for conditions such as intracranial aneurysms (both clipping and endovascular coiling), intracranial and spinal tumours, spinal degenerative conditions, spinal disc lesions, treatment of hydrocephalus, neuromodulation neurosurgery for pain and peripheral nerve surgery etc.

There are five consultant neurosurgeons, who have specialty interests in spinal, vascular and endovascular, paediatric, pituitary, skull base, advanced glioma and pain.  The Service is accredited by The Royal Australasian College of Surgeons and the Neurosurgical Society of Australasia for advanced/vocational/SET neurosurgical training.  The Service has four registrars, of whom one is a training registrar from Australia / New Zealand, and  another is a trainee from the USA.  The remaining two registrar positions are non-training positions and may be filled by registrars considering a career in Neurosurgery. There are currently two house officers, one being shared with the Neurology Department. There is a high level of support and supervision from the consultants for the registrars and by the consultants and registrars for the house officers. There are four full days of elective surgery per week and also a second theatre running at least one day per week, with acute cases also being dealt with in another acute theatre as necessary. All neurosurgeons have weekly outpatient clinics.

There are regular daily ward rounds and these always have a combined patient care and teaching focus. We have Tumour Board/neuropathology meetings and Journal club meetings.

Training in our service

We regard training in neurosurgery as an integral part of our day-to-day work, as every patient and their management can provide experiences in care. Appropriately-provided supervision is essential to do achieve this and we provide this. Training is given in all aspects of neurosurgical care: history-taking, neurological examination, imaging modalities and their interpretation, and then both non-operative and operative management, this last obviously involving neurosurgical operations. The unit has a big range of neurosurgical texts and has always been actively involved in the teaching of nurses, undergraduate medical students and house officers and registrars at all levels. We are accredited by The Royal Australasian College of Surgeons and the Neurosurgical Society of Australasia for advanced/vocational/SET neurosurgical training.

The neurosurgical training in Australia and New Zealand (Australasia) is world class and is undertaken by the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons and the Neurosurgical Society of Australasia. After the fourth post-graduate year, application can be made to be on the neurosurgical training program. There is a requirement to have sat and passed a generic surgical exam and a number of courses for acceptance. Set training is spent at any of the accredited hospitals for SET training, these being located in Australia and New Zealand.  A basic neurological exam will need to be passed in the first or second year to continue training.  For details of training requirements please refer to the Neurosurgical Society of Australasia (www.nsa.org.au).  The trainee can spend 2 years at the most in any one training unit, these being the larger units, and one year in the smaller units. Whist this means that the trainee will have to move between units in perhaps two countries, the benefits of a much broader neurosurgical training across several sites far outweigh any perceived travel disruptions. There are several subspecialties within neurosurgery and these are all exciting expanding fields nationally and internationally. An exit exam (RACS part 2) will need to be passed for admission for Fellowship.

Research

The department has been quite active over 30 years in submitting papers for publication and we have had, and continue to have, close associations with clinical and laboratory-based research personnel, both in Christchurch and Dunedin. The Christchurch School of Medicine is part of the Otago Medical School and so there is an association here that is also used.

The department has a very comprehensive and accurate database and this has provided and continues to provide material and information for clinical research and audit.

SMO / Staff Support

The consultant neurosurgeons, whether on call or not, provide strong support for RMOs and especially for the neurosurgical registrar on call. This support includes communication by telephone, texting, email, access to PACS images from remote sites and of course in person, for both non-operative and operative management. Operative management includes the registrar assisting with operations, being supervised in operations with the consultant scrubbed or in attendance or with the registrar as operating surgeon and the consultant available by phone or attendance if needed. As stated above, teaching is an integral part of patient care.

Advantages to training with the Department of Neurosurgery with Canterbury District Health Board

We have a busy, robust general neurosurgical unit, which covers virtually all neurosurgical conditions and operations. The unit is based in a busy, well-staffed and equipped medium-sized true large tertiary hospital with a full range of other specialties and support services. There is a strong sense of coherence and working together on our campus.

Enquiries

Mr Nicholas Finnis 
Clinical Director, Department of Neurosurgery and Clinical Director of the South Island Neurosurgical Service
Christchurch Hospital, Private Bag 4710
Christchurch, New Zealand.

Phone: (+64 3) 364 1217, Fax (+64 3) 364 1030
Email: Nicholas.Finnis@cdhb.health.nz 

Obstetrics and Gynaecology Service

Welcome from the team at Christchurch Women’s Hospital (CWH), where training is key to providing safe and effective care for the women, babies and families of Canterbury. We encourage anyone interested in Obstetrics and Gynaecology (O&G) as a career, or those who would like some experience in this speciality to consider a job in this progressive department.

Why specialise in Obstetrics and Gynaecology?

Obstetrics and Gynaecology is a rewarding career. It is a speciality that is both surgical and medical, with patients who are generally healthy and transitioning through a normal phase in their life. It has many branches - from obstetric medicine, to minimal access surgery, gynae-oncology, reproductive medicine, and maternal foetal medicine. Much of this medicine is advanced and continually changing.

Career Prospects

Your time spent employed at CWH and training in O&G will be useful for many clinical career paths. If you want to go into General Practice, knowledge and skills in women’s health will be highly useful. There is also the option of working in Family Planning or Sexual Health. Obstetric experience is highly useful for stints overseas - especially in developing countries.

If you want to specialise in O&G, the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetrics and Gynaecology provides an excellent training programme, which Christchurch Women’s is accredited to administer. The department is also very active in the administration and teaching of the Diploma of O&G.  http://www.otago.ac.nz/courses/qualifications/pgdipomg.html 

Employment Opportunities in O&G at Christchurch Women’s Hospital

Christchurch Women’s Hospital employs:

  • House Officers
  • Supported Junior Registrars
  • Senior Registrars
  • Gynae Oncology Fellow

Registrars can be training towards FRANZCOG, as we have accredited training posts. Others may want to train in the Pacific or UK and we are active in trying to get time spent at CWH accredited to other training bodies if at all possible. Registrars who do not want to pursue a career in O&G, but would like further experience, are welcome to apply. Part time / job sharing arrangements are considered on request. You will be employed by the Canterbury District Health Board.

All about our service

Women’s Health is part of the Women and Children’s Health Division (W&CH), providing secondary/tertiary obstetrics and gynaecology services.

The Maternity Service at W&CH is a primary/secondary/tertiary service providing care for the women of Canterbury. The primary service consists of two community birthing units at Rangiora and Lincoln hospitals and an early pregnancy management and termination service at the Gynaecology Procedure Unit.

  • Rangiora
    • 3 Birthing Rooms
    • 10 Postnatal beds
    • 4 General Convalescent beds
  • Lincoln
    • 7 inpatient maternity beds
    • 2 birthing beds
  • CWH (Maternity)
    • 15 Birthing beds
    • 45 Antenatal/postnatal
    • 5 Assessment beds
    • 2 Acute Observation beds
    • 4 Recovery beds
    • 4 general beds
    • 2 Caesarean section theatres
  • CWH (Gynaecology)
    • 27 inpatient beds
    • 5 Gynaecology Assessment unit beds
    • Outpatient Hysteroscopy and Colposcopy Services
  • Outpatients Department
    • 14 Outpatient  Rooms with CTG room
    • Day Assessment Unit – 3 chairs and capacity for 12 women daily
    • Fetal Maternal Unit – 1 x scan room, 2 x consultation rooms

A comprehensive secondary / tertiary service is provided with approximately 6,000 births per annum.  6900 births are registered in the Canterbury DHB and West Coast DHB catchment areas. Tertiary services include the West Coast and South Canterbury regions. There is a growing trend of the number of women presenting with one or more co-morbidities, and thus a growing trend of increasingly complex patients.

The Gynaecology Service at Christchurch Women’s Hospital provides secondary/tertiary services to the women of Canterbury and the South Island.

The Gynaecology Service comprises:

  • A Gynaecology Ward (27 beds)
  • Acute Gynaecology Assessment (5 assessment rooms)
  • Outpatient Hysteroscopy and Colposcopy Services
  • A Gynaecology Outpatients Department (14 examination rooms)
  • A Gynaecology Procedure Unit - first trimester termination of pregnancy services

The Service has a multi-professional approach to meet the complex needs of women, with approximately 3,000 gynaecology operations undertaken annually under general anaesthetic and a growing outpatient minor procedure service undertaken under local anaesthetic.

Gynaecological Oncology Services are provided to women from throughout the South Island. A strong partnership exists between the Gynaecological Oncologists and the Medical and Radiation Oncologists which ensures women receive a high standard of continuity of care at all times. Outreach clinics occur for Gynaecology Oncology in Dunedin and Invercargill.

Obstetric Physicians work closely with the obstetric teams, they attend three outpatient clinic sessions per week and are also available to offer advice and review ward patients during normal working hours. 

Training in our service

There are many educational opportunities which include the following meetings:

  • Perinatal mortality and morbidity
  • Pathology and radiology review
  • Colposcopy MDM
  • Gynae-oncology tumour board
  • Fetal abnormality advice
  • Intrapartum management

In addition the registrars meet for breakfast, CTG review and journal club every Wednesday morning and have 2 hours of protected teaching each week.

Radiology is fortunate to have a sonographer employed to teach registrars ultrasound skills. Two registrars spend half a day per week in the CWH radiology department over a six month period. This is primarily allocated to the first year ITP registrars and there is prospect for four registrars per year to rotate through this session.  During the periods where the registrars are on nights or leave, there are additional educational opportunities available.

CWH has a purpose-built colposcopy/outpatient hysteroscopy unit where registrars can attend clinics and gain experience.

CWH also runs four PROMPT courses per year. PROMPT is a multidisciplinary obstetric emergency management course. All registrars are expected to attend one of these courses.

CWH has a departmental credentialing system for registrars. Registrars will have different levels of supervision required for various procedures, and are expected to keep this up to date. This is to provide appropriate support and training, and to ensure patient safety.

The clinical presentations are varied as CWH is the tertiary referral centre. Our gynae-oncology service and Maternal Fetal Medicine service – being part of the NZ MFM network - cover the South Island. As a result there are many diverse and high risk cases presenting to the service. 

Research

CWH has an active University Department which is part of the University of Otago, Christchurch School of Medicine. There are a number of Senior Medical Officers actively involved with research, within both the University, and Canterbury DHB. The RANZCOG ITP registrars are required to perform research as part of their training, and are provided with excellent mentors and support for this.

 SMO / Staff Support

There is good SMO support for junior staff. SMOs on call are in the hospital from 08:00 to 17:00, and many stay overnight. As SMOs do not have any clinical duties the day after their 24 hr call, they are available to be of assistance overnight as required. All SMOs take an active part in the teaching and supervision of junior doctors. 

Advantages to training at Christchurch Women’s Hospital, Canterbury District Health Board

Christchurch Women’s Hospital has a reputation for providing exceptional training, with an excellent pass rate for college exams.

The Department provides a structured and supportive training experience, with varied tertiary level training opportunities for all junior doctors, regardless of their long term career goals. CWH has a multidisciplinary team of motivated health professionals creating a great working environment. 

Enquiries

Clinical Director
Dr Janet Whineray
Email: Janet.Whineray@cdhb.health.nz 

O&G Consultant – RANZCOG Training Supervisor

Dr Jane Fielder
Email: Jane.Fielder@cdhb.health.nz 

O&G Consultant – RANZCOG Training Supervisor

Dr Emma Jackson
Email: emma.jackson@cdhb.health.nz 

Senior Resident
Dr Joanna Knight
Email: Joanna.Knight@cdhb.health.nz 

Older Persons’ Health Specialist Service

A warm welcome will await you from all of the staff at Older Persons’ Health Specialist Service (OPHSS), whether you join our close-knit teams for a few months to get some general experience or whether you are planning to train and specialise in this area of medicine.

Why work in Older Persons Health?

With the ageing population, the health of older people has increasing importance and knowledge of the complex issues will be important, no matter what area of medicine you eventually work in. Where better in New Zealand to get that experience than in OPHSS, which provides a comprehensive range of geriatric and old age psychiatry services for over 70,000 people over the age of 65yrs. Canterbury is at the forefront of the care of older people and a number of innovative service models of care have been developed recently. 

Where are we based?

The majority of the service is now at Burwood Hospital in new purpose-built facilities, following a move from The Princess Margaret Hospital in mid-2016. We now have a comprehensive Radiology service on-site and have close connections with the other departments at Burwood Hospital - Orthopaedics, Spinal Unit, Brain Injury service and Pain Management. The new facility includes dedicated workspace and social space for RMOs. Community-based services are located across a variety of sites in Christchurch.

About our Service

There are 5 Older Persons Health Inpatient (OPH) wards, including a specialised stroke rehabilitation ward, 2 Older Persons Mental Health (OPMH) wards, psychiatry of old age day hospital, general and specialised community service teams including community stroke and psychiatry of old age teams. Consultation-liaison services (including a delirium team) are provided from both the general and psychiatric side to other hospitals and services in Canterbury. General outpatient clinics are augmented with specialised memory clinic and bone clinics, and liaison with the regional movement disorders clinic. There is a dedicated older age ECT service.

There are a number of linkages across the CDHB through the Senior Medical Officer (SMO) workforce including Geriatricians working both in OPHSS as well as other areas such as General Medicine, Orthopaedic Medicine, Surgical Medicine, Stroke Medicine as well as Bone Health Services. 

Medical Staff in our Service

Within Geriatric Medicine, there are 10.15 FTE SMO (15 staff) and 20 FTE RMO (11 Registrars and 9 House Officers). In OPMH, there are 7.6 FTE SMO (11 staff including 2 Medical Officers) and 3.5 FTE RMO (2.5 Registrars and 1 House Officer).

There is an ongoing close relationship between OPHSS and the University of Otago (Christchurch School of Medicine) with the University having a unit at Burwood and a joint appointment of a Geriatrician and Professor of Medicine, as well as New Zealand’s only academic Old Age Psychiatrist of Old Age (part time). There is an active Old Age Academic Unit.

In addition to the clinical care provided to patients, there have been a large number of research publications by the OPHSS Medical Staff both in national and international journals.

OPHSS and the CDHB have a very well regarded Advanced Training Programme in Australasia for both Geriatric Medicine and Psychiatry of Old Age. This is in addition to the training of general medical and old age specific issues for Registrars and House Officers who are not Advanced Trainees. These runs provide excellent teaching opportunities in both geriatric and general medicine and there are regular departmental education sessions including RMO teaching sessions, grand rounds, audit meetings, journal clubs and mortality and morbidity meetings. The senior medical staff are consistently acknowledged in providing excellent support to RMOs both within and also out of hours.

Enquiries

Dr Sarah Hurring, Clinical Director, Older Persons Health Service
Phone: (+64 3) 383 6836
Email: sarah.hurring@cdhb.health.nz

Dr Jo  Reeves and Dr Colin Peebles, Joint Clinical Directors, Older Persons Mental Health Service
Phone: (+64 3) 383 6836
Emails:  jo.reeves@cdhb.health.nz    and     colin.peebles@cdhb.health.nz

Oncology - Medical

 

Welcome

The Medical Oncology Service is part of the Canterbury Regional Cancer and Blood Service. It provides medical oncology services to patients in Canterbury, West Coast and South Canterbury.

Why specialise in Medical Oncology?

Medical Oncology is a sub-specialty of Internal Medicine which manages a wide range of cancers with medication and supportive care. The field of cancer medicine is changing rapidly and the expanding research knowledge is increasingly being reflected in new treatments. Medical Oncology is a demanding but rewarding specialty and requires a special focus on patients and their families as they are guided along their cancer journey. Medical Oncology is suited to trainees with an interest in the humanistic aspects of medicine, a willingness to manage acutely unwell and vulnerable patients and requires strong communication skills and an empathetic approach.

Career Prospects

Medical Oncology is an area of medicine that is growing rapidly and expanding beyond the main Cancer Centres into provincial centres and as such, there is a need for more specialists in this area.

Medical Staff in Oncology

There are eleven Medical Oncologists, Nine Radiation Oncologists, five Radiation Oncology Registrars, five Medical Oncology Registrars and two Relief Registrars who cover Radiation Oncology, Medical Oncology and Palliative Care. There are two House Officers who cover Medical Oncology and Radiation Oncology three months at a time and one Reliever who covers Medical Oncology, Radiation Oncology and Haematology. Palliative Care is closely aligned with Oncology and is staffed by 2 Palliative Care Physicians, a nurse practitioner and clinical nurse specialists.

All about our service

The Oncology Service, Christchurch Hospital, incorporates the disciplines of Medical Oncology and Radiation Oncology. It is a busy unit and we offer a full range of outpatient and inpatient services for the non-surgical management of cancer. There is close liaison with the Department of Haematology which provides a full range of services including high dose chemotherapy and autologous and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

The service incorporates a multidisciplinary team approach with close liaisons with diagnostic and support services and nursing, medical and surgical colleagues.

Visiting Medical Oncology outpatient consultation services are provided to Timaru Hospital, Grey Hospital, and Ashburton Hospital, with chemotherapy being delivered at all of those sites.

Registrars working in Medical Oncology will have opportunities to work in outpatients, the inpatient ward and in an acute triage role.

Training in Oncology

Oncology is accredited to train five Medical Oncology Registrars and four Radiation Oncology Registrars. Teaching is held several times a week and registrars are encouraged to attend regular tumour specific multidisciplinary meetings which provide great learning opportunities.

Advanced training in Medical Oncology (after passing the Part I exam) is via the Royal Australasian College of Physicians and is currently a three year programme. At least 6 months of core training must be in another centre. Training for 6 month periods in Palliative Care, Radiation Oncology and Haematology can be cross-credited to Medical Oncology training up to 12 months total. For more information visit http://www.racp.org.nz/page/specialty/medical-oncology.

Research

An interest in research when training in Medical Oncology is essential and the service in Christchurch is actively involved in clinical trials.

SMO / Staff Support

The Medical Oncologists pride themselves on their approachability and welcome opportunities to use all clinical situations as teaching opportunities. There is 24 hour SMO on-call availability.

Advantages to training in Medical Oncology, Canterbury District Health Board

With ten Medical Oncologists employed with a vast range of experience, sub-specialty interests and other skills, the Christchurch Medical Oncology service is regarded nationally as one of the best staffed and most functional units in New Zealand.

Enquiries

Dr David Gibbs Clinical Director, Medical Oncology
Email: david.gibbs@cdhb.health.nz

Oncology - Radiation

Welcome

The Radiation Oncology Service is part of the Canterbury Regional Cancer and Blood Service. It provides radiation oncology services to patients in Canterbury, West Coast and South Canterbury and the Nelson/ Marlborough region.

Why specialise in Radiation Oncology?

Radiation Oncology is a discipline which manages a wide range of cancers with radiation and supportive care. The field of cancer medicine is changing rapidly and the expanding research knowledge is increasingly being reflected in new treatments. Radiation Oncology is a demanding but rewarding specialty and requires a special focus on patients and their families as they are guided along their cancer journey. Radiation Oncology is suited to trainees with an interest in the humanistic aspects of medicine and requires strong communication skills and an empathetic approach. It is a career which offers oncologists the opportunity to work with cutting edge technology to deliver a treatment with high response rates for many patients. 

Further information is available at the following link:

http://www.ranzcr.edu.au/radiation-oncology/a-career-in-radiation-oncology.

Career Prospects

Radiation Oncology is an area of medicine that is predicted to grow in the years ahead and as such, there will be a need for more specialists in this area.

Medical Staff in Oncology

There are ten Medical Oncologists, Nine Radiation Oncologists., five Radiation Oncology Registrars, five Medical Oncology Registrars and two Relief Registrars who cover Radiation Oncology, Medical Oncology and Palliative Care. There are two House Officers who cover Medical Oncology and Radiation Oncology three months at a time and one Reliever who covers Medical Oncology, Radiation Oncology and Haematology. Palliative Care is closely aligned with Oncology and is staffed by 2 Palliative Care Physicians, a nurse practitioner and clinical nurse specialists.

All about our service

The Oncology Service, Christchurch Hospital, incorporates the disciplines of Medical and Radiation Oncology. It is a busy unit and we offer a full range of outpatient and inpatient services for the non-surgical management of cancer. There is close liaison with the Department of Haematology which provides a full range of services including high dose chemotherapy and autologous and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

The service incorporates a multidisciplinary team approach with close liaisons with diagnostic and support services and nursing, medical and surgical colleagues.

Visiting Radiation Oncology outpatient consultation services are provided to Nelson Hospital, Grey Hospital and Blenheim Hospital.

Registrars working in Radiation Oncology will have opportunities to work in outpatients, the inpatient ward and in the radiation planning and treatment areas.

Training in Oncology

Oncology is accredited to train five Radiation Oncology Registrars. Protected formal teaching time is provided weekly and registrars are encouraged to attend this session, other teaching opportunities offered in the department as well as regular tumour specific multidisciplinary meetings.

The radiation oncology specialist training is via the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists (RANZCR). It is a 5 year training programme based entirely in radiation oncology. RMO’s in their PG3 year are eligible for application to the training programme. For more information please see the RANZCR website. http://www.ranzcr.edu.au/radiation-oncology/a-career-in-radiation-oncology

Research

An interest in research when training in Radiation Oncology is essential and the service in Christchurch is actively involved in clinical trials. A training registrar is required to complete a supervised research project during their training period.

SMO / Staff Support

The Radiation Oncologists pride themselves on their approachability and welcome opportunities to use all clinical situations as teaching opportunities. There is 24 hour SMO on-call availability.

Advantages to training in Radiation Oncology, Canterbury District Health Board

With nine Radiation Oncologists employed with a vast range of experience, sub-specialty interests and other skills, the Christchurch Radiation Oncology service provides an excellent training opportunity. Members of our radiation oncology teams are actively involved in all levels of training, have a strong commitment to teaching and are represented on RANZCR college training and examining boards.

Enquiries

Dr Avtar Raina

Clinical Director, Radiation Oncology
Phone: (+64 3) 364 0753
Email: avtar.raina@cdhb.health.nz

Dr Melissa James

Director of Training Radiation Oncology
Phone: (+64 3) 364 0753
Email: melissa.james@cdhb.health.nz

Ophthalmology

Welcome

Welcome to the Canterbury Eye Service  at Christchurch Hospital.

Why specialise in Ophthalmology?

Ophthalmology is a rewarding specialty with its mix of children and elderly patients, medical and surgical treatments, rapidly advancing technology and fascinating anatomy, physiology and optics. There is a growing demand for ophthalmologists because many diseases of the eye affect the increasingly prevalent older population, such as macular degeneration, glaucoma and cataract. Basic eye assessment is fundamental for general practice and other specialties and there are exciting and revolutionary treatments and technologies appearing regularly that make ophthalmology a rewarding and dynamic specialty.

Career Prospects

You would do well to choose a career in Ophthalmology, but even if you just want an introduction to eye conditions for general practice, then a busy Ophthalmology Department is the place to get it. We have four accredited RANZCO training posts, three non-training registrar posts leading up to training posts (or as extended preparations for general practice) and one full-time House Officer (for a less intensive introduction to Ophthalmology for general practice or other specialty).

Medical Staff in our Service

We have four training registrar posts accredited by RANZCO, three non-training registrar posts leading up to the training posts and one House Officer (with some time dedicated to ophthalmology as well as attending to the general medical needs of our outpatient and surgical patients.)

All about our service

The Canterbury Eye Service at Christchurch Hospital provides acute and elective services at a secondary and tertiary level to the people of Canterbury and Westland and provides tertiary level services to the South Island and quaternary level to people of New Zealand.

The service consists of thirteen consultant ophthalmologists, one Fellow, four vocational trainees, three non-vocational training registrars and one House Officer. The Department has a staff of 60 in total.

All subspecialty areas of ophthalmology are covered by Fellowship tribes specialists in our department. The outpatient clinics and Department of Ophthalmology are housed in a separate building adjacent to the main Christchurch Hospital campus, with ward, surgical theatres and an after-hours acute clinic room in the main hospital. We will be moving to the new outpatients building later in 2018. 

Training registrars run elective clinics and learn surgery under supervision of a consultant, rotating through various subspecialty runs.

Non-training registrars run acute, elective and some procedural outpatient clinics and attend a weekly theatre session.

The House Officer checks patients’ general fitness for surgery, participates in acute eye clinics, attends one theatre session per week and learns some basic eye procedures in outpatients.

Training in our service

All our resident staff participate in weekly clinical meetings, tutorials, a monthly journal club and can apply to attend courses.

RANZCO training is of five years' duration.

Research

Research is encouraged and the opportunity to present papers at national academic meetings is supported. We have an association with the University of Otago Medical and a number of SMOs in our department hold roles as Clinical Lecturer.

SMO / Staff Support

Registrars always work under supervision of a consultant and an on-call consultant is always available to call at any hour of the day or night. The House Officer has medical backup provided by other services in the adjacent hospital and always has access to ophthalmology registrars working with him/her.

The Medical Staff are well supported by nursing and technical staff such as Orthoptists and Optometrists. 

Advantages to training at Department of Ophthalmology, Canterbury District Health Board

The Department of Ophthalmology offers one of the best supervised and hands-on surgical training experiences in Australasia.

Enquiries

Dr Rebecca Stack, Clinical Director 
Email: rebecca.stack@cdhb.health.nz
Phone: (+64 3) 364 0640, ext. 80977

Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

Welcome

The following information provides an overview of the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and some insight into our interesting specialty.

Why specialise in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery?

The specialty is defined as “the surgical specialty that includes the diagnosis, surgical and related treatments of a wide spectrum of diseases, injuries, defects and aesthetic aspects of the mouth, teeth, jaws, face, head and neck.” It is an internationally recognised surgical as well as a dental specialty.

The specialty works closely with others in the multidisciplinary management of patients with head and neck disorders and provides comprehensive management in facial trauma and maxillofacial pathology.

Career Prospects

The service based at Christchurch Hospital covers acute and elective outpatient and inpatient care, with referrals accepted from primary care as well as other specialties. A busy on-call service manages acute infections and facial fractures, whilst elective referrals cover a wide spectrum of mouth and jaw conditions, providing extensive experience for trainees in the specialty as well as broad experience for those considering general practice.

Medical Staff in our Service

Our department presently has 4 part-time visiting specialist consultant Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, and 1 visiting consultant in Oral Medicine.

There are 2 advanced RACDS trainees in full-time registrar posts, one full-time non-accredited registrar and the service is supported by a dental house surgeon who participates in the on-call roster as well as daily activities.

Responsibility for day-to-day inpatients is shared with a PGY1 or 2 medical RMO appointed to support the service.

All about our service

Medical RMOs allocated to the service predominantly have responsibility for day-to-day care of inpatients, although attendance at outpatient clinics and operating sessions is encouraged, as well as departmental teaching and audit sessions.

Training in our service

Regular departmental radiology and pathology audit sessions are held, teaching sessions and journal clubs relevant to the specialty.

Prerequisites for training positions in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery in Australia and New Zealand include registered medical and dental degrees, and completion of a minimum of 12 months of Surgery in General at PGY2 or beyond. Information is available from the Board of Studies Handbook Part A

Research

Trainees in the specialty are required to complete a clinical research project and also encouraged to present at specialty meetings and conferences.

Opportunities exist for completion of a part-time M Med Sc with the Christchurch School of Medicine, University of Otago.

SMO / Staff Support

Supervision and support for specialty trainees and RMOs allocated to the department is provided by the consultants, both on a daily basis and during appointed on-call activities.

Advantages to training at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Canterbury District Health Board

Trainees are exposed to a wide spectrum of the scope of the specialty and are supervised through a formal assessment of clinical skills, towards eligibility to sit the specialty Fellowship with a view to vocational registration.

Advanced trainees are encouraged to rotate to other clinical training centres in Australia and New Zealand.

Enquiries

Please contact:
Mr Jason Erasmus Clinical Director - jason.erasmus@cdhb.health.nz 

Orthopaedics

Welcome

Many thanks for taking the time to consider a position in orthopaedics. Having experience in orthopaedics is essential for junior doctors wanting to take up a career in a number of different specialties including General Practice, Emergency Medicine, Geriatrics, etc. The Orthopaedic Service looks forward to providing junior doctors the opportunity to learn and gain experience in orthopaedics.

Why specialise in Orthopaedics?

In addition to providing essential experience to junior doctors to undertake a career in numerous areas of medicine, orthopaedics as a career option is one that you will find both stimulating and rewarding. The service is a particularly busy one with a constant flow of acute patients presenting for assessment and treatment. We also have a high demand for corrective elective assessment and surgery in patients of all ages.

Within Orthopaedics there is a growing level of subspecialisation and in Christchurch these sub speciality interests are well covered. Trauma constitutes the bulk of service delivery and as such provides some very interesting cases that challenge the skills of our surgeons to restore the patients. Other sub speciality groups include upper limb, hand, paediatrics, foot and ankle, spine and major joint.

Career prospects

The Canterbury Orthopaedic Department has a strong and deserved reputation for providing excellent training to support junior doctors wanting placement on the Australasian Orthopaedic Training Programme those qualifying to become an Orthopaedic Surgeon. Although most of the training is directed at the registrar level the Department does provide very good experience for both the first year House Officers and the more senior House Officers. The Orthopaedic service in the acute wards in conjunction with the Health Care of the Elderly service, provide very good experience and training in managing the acute patients of all ages. The Orthopaedic Outpatient Department manages an assessment and treatment service 7 days per week for minor acute orthopaedic cases. The positions here provide valuable experience directly managing acute patients (assessment and treatment) in a supportive environment.

Referrals are received from the community and through the Emergency Department. The Burwood Hospital service provides posts for senior House Officers managing the orthopaedic elective surgical cases plus a mix of ACC funded elective surgical cases, plus patients referred to the Burwood Orthopaedic Rehabilitation Unit. All these positions provide the interested doctor ample opportunity to learn and gain valuable experience with very good surgeon input and support. Three Fellow positions exist in upper limb, lower limb and trauma which are very sought after positions. The positions are available to suitable applicants from around the world and they are able to work in both the public and private sector.

Medical Staff in Orthopaedics

The orthopaedic service employs Surgeons, Fellows, Registrars (on Australasian Training Scheme), non training scheme Registrars, Senior House Officers and House Officers (PGY 1 and 2). Also a constant part of the service are medical students, who again come from all parts of the world.

The positions available are as follows:

  • Surgeons (mostly part time employees): 18 posts
  • Fellows (full time but shared with the private sector): 3 posts
  • Trainee registrars: 6
  • Non Trainee Registrars: 7 (includes 3 relievers)
  • Christchurch Hospital Ward House Officers: 6
  • Christchurch Orthopaedic Outpatient HOs: 5
  • Burwood Hospital House Officers: Surgical Unit - 3, Rehab - 1
  • Relieving orthopaedic SHO/HOs: 4

The allocation of dedicated service relievers provides greater continuity and opportunity for the House Officer and to the patient and service.

All about our service

The Orthopaedic Service provides an assessment and treatment service to patients referred to them either acutely or as arranged. The acute service operates out of Christchurch Hospital where patients are admitted through the Emergency Department and Orthopaedic Outpatient Department. Patients requiring surgery will receive this at Christchurch Hospital with the occasional patient being transferred to Burwood Hospital for surgery. Access to a full range of diagnostic and clinical support services exists at Christchurch Hospital. Burwood Hospital provides most of the orthopaedic service for elective patients, both assessment and surgery. Paediatric patients are the exception as are complex elective patients who require or are at risk of requiring ICU back up. The patients over the age of 60 are managed jointly by the orthopaedic surgeons and the Health Care of the elderly physicians.

For the acute service each day begins with a review of all patients waiting for an operation. Ward rounds are completed following this meeting. Follow up fracture clinics for acute patients following discharge are held daily Monday to Friday.

The service is required to manage a minimum of 1100 hip or knee replacement operations annually with approximately 500 other orthopaedic operations. The acute service accounts for approximately 65 to 70% of the total admissions to the service. The service sees approximately 45,000 outpatient patients (a mixture of first and follow up appointments) annually. As a tertiary provider referrals are received from Canterbury as well as other parts of New Zealand (both South Island and the North Island.)

Training in our service

The Orthopaedic Service has a full academic programme. The Registrars with the Fellows have a weekly journal club and trauma meeting. Surgeons are fully involved in these dedicated sessions. Every Wednesday morning there is a combined surgeon, Registrar and House officer continuing medical education sessions that runs for 90 minutes. The daily trauma meeting where patients waiting for an operation are reviewed individually, is also an effective teaching session. The House Officers have a weekly teaching session which is delivered by the Registrars. Changes are being made to the acute surgeons’ daily programme to enable the surgeon to provide a more educational ward round each day.

The junior medical staff are well supported to attend the necessary training courses.

Research

The Orthopaedic Service is well recognised for undertaking research. The National Joint Register is managed by the surgeons and a close association exists with the University of Otago Medical School. Undertaking research is essential for doctors seeking to get on the training scheme. This remains a priority right through the Trainees training years. The service and surgeons fully support these endeavours.

SMO/Staff Support

The Surgeons are very supportive of their junior medical staff, both in hours and out of hours. In response to this support the orthopaedic Registrars work hard to ensure service coverage is maintained.

Advantages to come here

The training record of orthopaedic registrar teaching and support is something the service is proud of. The service workload covers a wide variety cases in a sufficient case volume to allow the junior medical staff to gain very good experience. This applies to all medical staff at different stages of experience and training. The surgeons are committed to maintaining this record and support those staff that want to learn.

Enquiries

Any enquires can be directed to the Clinical Director Mr John McKie, the Registrar Education Supervisor Mr Andrew Vincent and House Officer Educational Director Mr Alex Malone or the Service Manager David Brydon. We are sure that any staff member working in the service or has worked in service would be able to provide you with a good account of the service and their experience.

Otolaryngology

The Department of Otolaryngology (Head and Neck Surgery) has seven part-time Consultants, two Advanced Trainee Registrars, and one Basic Trainee Registrar (who rotates through other surgical specialties) and two House Officers. The department has one Ward which it shares with the Department of Ophthalmology. The Department covers the full range of the specialty.

As well as all the routine common and traditional conditions usually handled in otolaryngology departments, services also include Endocscopic sinus surgery, rhinoplasty and otoplasty, investigation and treatment of sleep disorders, paediatric otolaryngology and airway problems, reconstructive middle ear surgery, surgical treatment of head and neck cancers, skull base surgery, otoneurology and otoneurosurgery and cochlear implantation.

A 24 hour acute service is provided. Typically this involves cases with severe epistaxis, foreign bodies in airways or oesophagus, facial and soft tissue neck injury, facial pharyngeal and deep space infections in the head and neck, etc.

For further information:

Mr Mark Ward, Clinical Director
Phone: (+64 3) 364 0640
Email: mark.ward@cdhb.govt.nz

Paediatric Medicine

Welcome

Thanks for your interest in training with the Child Health Service at Christchurch Hospital.

Why specialise in Paediatrics?

Paediatrics is the branch of medicine which deals with the health and wellbeing of children and young people. It is a broad and diverse discipline, covering many subspecialties, and one in which there can be great job satisfaction and personal reward. Having an affinity for working with children is clearly advantageous.

Career Prospects

Could include:

  • Hospital or Private practice paediatrician (general or subspecialist)
  • General practitioner with interest in paediatrics - very useful to have some paediatric knowledge and experience.
  • Emergency Medicine, Anaesthesia, Surgical specialties, etc. all of these areas of medicine encounter paediatric patients. It is very helpful to have some basic experience in treating paediatric patients in these fields, prior to entering other long term training programmes.

Medical Staff in our Service

The paediatric department employs house officers from PGY2 onwards. All house officer runs are 6 months in duration and cover paediatric medicine, paediatric general surgery and paediatric relief runs. Our house officers are encouraged to enrol for the Diploma of Child Health with the University of Otago.

If you enjoy your time in Paediatrics, you may wish to continue training at a registrar level. These positions require applicants to have at least 6 months of paediatric experience and a registrar position is for 12 months. We have a combination of “Basic Training” registrars (pre exams) and “Advanced Training” registrars (some of our registrars are not enrolled with a training programme either). Our House Officer numbers are seven at any one time and we currently have 26 paediatric registrar positions. There are 8 registrars working at Christchurch Women’s Hospital doing a NICU rotation for 6 months at any one time.

The SMOs within Child Health include 6 Neonatologists, 3 Paediatric surgeons and 4 Paediatric Oncologists/Haematologists. The remainder of the SMOs number ~18 and include General Paediatricians and subspecialists covering areas such as Gastroenterology, Genetics, Infectious Diseases, Respiratory Paediatrics, Developmental Paediatrics, Endocrinology and Neurology.

Christchurch provides tertiary level care for paediatric oncology patients for the South Island, as well as the lower part of the North Island. We also provide tertiary level care for paediatric neurology and gastroenterology for the South Island.

All about our service

As a house officer, you will be rotated through 3 runs over six months, at least one of which will be an acute inpatient team. Your team will also have on-call days and as part of that team you will assist in the review and management of acute admissions through the Children’s Acute Assessment unit (CAA). Over your six months you will gain experience in history taking, clinical examination and procedural work. The procedures you should get exposure to include venepuncture, iv lines, bladder aspirates and possibly lumbar punctures. At all times you will be supported by a registrar and an SMO. There is an on-call roster and you will be expected to have a rostered long day 1-2 days a week. Every 6 weeks, you will have one set of nights shift and one weekend long day shift (both Saturday and Sunday).

Registrar attachments rotate every 6 months. As a junior registrar your attachments are likely to include an acute inpatient run, relief run and a stint in NICU. As your experience in paediatrics increases, you will be rotated through outpatient runs which can be of a general paediatric or subspecialty nature. Many of the outpatient runs are mixtures of various specialties. All procedural skills mentioned for house officers are also expected at a registrar level. Those working in NICU will also get exposure to other procedures including intubation, long lines, umbilical lines and chest drains. There is not an expectation of proficiency in these skills prior to working in the NICU. NICU registrars also are rostered on for retrieval service, which can include flying to other locations around New Zealand for transport and retrieval of unwell newborn infants.

On-duty rosters for paediatric registrars at Christchurch hospital include long days, weekends and nights.  The frequency and type of shifts you do depend upon what your job allocation is usually.  As at January 2017, the frequency of after hours duties is as below, though this may change in the future.

Weekday night shifts (Monday –Thursday) = 1:7 weeks for inpatient and CHOC registrars

Weekend nights (Friday – Sunday) = 1:7 weeks for outpatient registrars

Ward weekends = 1:7 weekends

CAA weekends  = 1:8 weekends

Senior Reg Weekends = 1:3.5 weekends (SR does not work nights)

Long days = 1:7.5 weekdays

Winter Sunday shift = 1:15 Sundays (mid April through mid December)

Winter weekday evenings = 1:14 weeks (mid April through mid December)

All RMOs working in the paediatric service are allocated a named SMO supervisor to provide support and mentorship during your paediatric attachment.

Training in our service

As mentioned earlier, house officers are encouraged to enrol with the University of Otago for the Diploma of Child Health.

Paediatric training as a long term career option is under the governance of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians (RACP). Training takes minimum of six years of accredited training time and is divided into basic training and advanced training. One can only enter advanced training after successfully passing the RACP college exams (written and clinical), as well as having fulfilled a number of other mandatory requirements, including having a minimum of three years of accredited basic training time. We are a level three accredited site for training purposes.

Advanced training also takes a minimum of three years. At this time trainees need to decide whether they wish to become general paediatricians or subspecialists. Each area has individual training requirements under the governance of select committees. At the completion of training, you will be awarded with a Fellowship of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians (FRCAP). Anyone wishing to discuss paediatric training in more detail is welcome to contact Dr Cameron Dickson, Director of Paediatric Training for an informal chat.

We have an active education programme including journal clubs, weekly “grand round” presentations, teleconferenced education sessions from Starship hospital and regular formal tutorial sessions on various topics.

Research

Within our service we have active research programmes and a number of individuals being supervised by SMO staff for higher awards (e.g. Master’s, PhD, etc).

Research is encouraged at a junior level and opportunity for audit projects are available.

SMO / Staff Support

As detailed earlier, all RMOs working within paediatrics have a named SMO supervisor to provide support and mentorship during their time with our service. During normal working hours, the on take team’s registrar will take calls from GPs and ED as to patients either needing admission/ review or for advice. The on take SMO will be available to provide assistance at all times. Out of normal working hours, there will be two registrars (three in Winter) and a house officer on site together until 2230 hours. Overnight, there is a paediatric registrar and house officer on site. The on call SMO is available 24 hours of the day for advice, support and patient reviews.

Advantages to training in Paediatrics at Canterbury District Health Board

The child health service at Christchurch hospital is perfect in terms of its size and scope to provide ideal exposure and support for trainees. It is large enough to provide excellent exposure to most areas of paediatric medicine and yet not too large to be impersonal. We are a supportive department and take a very active role in education. We have most subspecialties covered, and those where we don’t, one of the general paediatricians take active roles in overseeing these patients with support from adult colleagues and peripheral specialists who also provide outreach clinics to our hospital.

Christchurch based candidates have been extremely successful in the RACP exams over time.

Enquiries

Dr Clare Doocey Clinical Director Paediatrics
Email: Clare.Doocey@cdhb.health.nz

Dr Cameron Dickson Director Paediatric Training
Email: Cameron.Dickson@cdhb.health.nz

Paediatric Surgery

The Department of Paediatric Surgery is a small but active unit that provides inpatient/outpatient surgical care for the children of Canterbury and the West Coast, as well as providing outreach paediatric surgical services to Invercargill, Dunedin, Timaru, Blenheim and Nelson.

All general paediatric surgery on children up to the age of 15 are admitted under this unit. The unit also provides a surgical neonatal service to the neonatal unit at Womens' Hospital. The unit runs weekly outpatient clinics, elective operating sessions and provides 24 hour emergency cover for paediatric surgery. It works closely with both the departments of Paediatrics and Surgery. Major or complex cases are referred from Greymouth, Dunedin, Invercargill, Timaru, Blenheim and Nelson, and occasionally from the North Island.

The unit provides a comprehensive teaching programme for the 5th year medical students and trainee interns. Also, it has 2 accredited training posts for the Board of Paediatric Surgery's SET training programme for the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons. All RMOs are involved in audit and teaching and are encouraged to contribute to the unit's clinical reserach projects. The unit is strongly supportive of its junior staff.

For further information:

Professor Spencer W Beasley, Clinical Director
Phone: (+64 3) 364 0432
Fax: (+64 3) 364 0352
Email: spencer.beasley@cdhb.govt.nz

Palliative Care

Welcome

Palliative care maximises living for people faced with life-limiting illness.

The goal of the Palliative Care Service is to work alongside patients, their important support people and their medical/surgical teams to help achieve and maintain maximum physical, emotional, intellectual, spiritual, vocational, cultural and social potentials, however limited they may be as a result of disease progression. We recognise that dying is a normal process and we aim to neither hasten nor postpone death.

The Canterbury Palliative Care Service is an integrated service incorporating the tertiary hospital, community services and Nurse Maude Hospice.

Why specialise in Palliative Medicine?

Palliative Care brings together the intellectual and academic interest of medicine with the concern for treating a person holistically with an emphasis on care and comfort. Palliative care is a growing field of need and offers many areas of special interest for the clinician. It offers a specialty where past career and life choices are valuable in a new setting.

The “Palliative Approach” is appropriate in many fields of medicine but can feel foreign within specialist services unless a doctor has been exposed to Palliative Medicine as an entity. This argues strongly for spending some time in Palliative Care whatever one’s specialty choice will be eventually.

Career Prospects

Our population continues to age. With this comes the increased need for the services that Palliative Care offers. This has been recognised at governmental levels and there is goodwill towards increasing the workforce within Palliative Care. This bodes well for career prospects for Palliative Medicine Physicians and also for doctors who have an interest in the field.

Medical Staff in our Service

Five SMOs work as a team across the hospital, hospice and in the community. Two trainee RMO positions are available and one rotating position.

All about our service

We provide a consultative service to all wards and hospitals across the CDHB. There is an increasing collaboration with the Community and Hospice which service the greater Canterbury region - with some responsibility for the West Coast.

The “Team” within the hospital consists of Consultant Physician, Nurse Practitioner, Specialist Palliative Care Nurses and Registrar. In the community we are joined by two more consultant physicians, registered and specialist nurses, another trainee registrar and Allied Health Care Specialists.

We will assess the patient promptly and where possible inpatients will be seen on the day of referral. Patients in the community are contacted on the day of their referral and a convenient time is negotiated to see them - usually within 3 days.

We assist with planning for discharge and liaison with community services.

Clinics allow for an integrated approach between hospital and community specialties. Our team members are frequently involved in meetings with the patient and their extended family to explore the implications of the sufferer's disease and the impact this will have on their living situation.

Research

Research in the field is highly valued and encouraged where there is an interest in contributing to the body of knowledge. There is excellent access to the Oncology Service Research Unit - actively supported to join multi-centre trials. Assistance with ethics approval, nursing etc is provided by CORU.

SMO / Staff Support

24 hour SMO on-call availability. The senior staff pride themselves on their approachability and welcome opportunities to use difficult clinical situations as teaching opportunities.

Advantages to training at Palliative Care, Canterbury District Health Board

We have an integrated Palliative Care Service allowing for full training in Palliative Medicine within the region.

We are an accredited site for the Post Graduate Diploma of Clinical Palliative Medicine. (This is a useful further training for other clinicians - such as Family Doctors - with an interest in Palliative care.)

There is an active education and training programme in place.

Relationships with GPs ,community services and residential facilities are excellent, with an active educational focus directed towards them.

Enquiries

Dr Kate Grundy
Clinical Director, Canterbury Palliative Care Services
Phone: (+64 3) 364 1473
Email: kate.grundy@cdhb.govt.nz

Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

Why specialise in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery?

Plastic Surgery is about treating a wide range of patients and conditions, often as part of a multidisciplinary team. The work is varied, interesting and colleagial.

Career Prospects

The RMOs rotating through plastic surgery gain both generally useful experience (such as wound care and acute hand injuries) for primary care or other surgical specialties as well as specialty-specific experience for those who may be interested in a career in plastic surgery. Many of our trainees have been junior RMOs with the service.

Medical Staff in our Service

The department has 2 house officers, three rotating surgical registrars, one fellow, one SET 1 advanced trainee and three SET 2-5 advanced trainees in Plastic Surgery. They work in three teams and each team has three consultants. 

All about our service

House surgeons are based on Ward 20 and 21 (Paeds) caring for both acute and elective patients. The elective patients are mainly receiving cancer reconstruction (skin, breast, head and neck) but also includes congenital reconstruction of hand and head and neck anomalies. The acute patients are mainly hand injuries, facial injuries, acute wounds and burns.

They also attend outpatients (which is adjacent to the ward) for both consultant clinics and patient reviews. Skin cancer surgery is based at Burwood Hospital and many house surgeons and all registrars area able to attend and gain experience in local anaesthetic skin cancer surgery. House surgeons are welcome to attend consultant general anaesthetic lists at both Christchurch and Burwood Hospital.

Training in our service

We have a CME programme that includes all medical staff involvement on alternate Monday mornings. In addition registrar teaching is scheduled for Monday lunchtimes, Tuesday before work and Wednesday before work. For information about training in plastic surgery, see www.surgeons.org

Research

The department is involved with the undergraduate teaching programme of University of Otago, Christchurch. Most registrars are involved with clinical research projects.

Enquiries

Interested candidates should contact the Resident Doctors’ Support Team in the first instance on telephone 00 64 3 364 1585. For specific queries about the department, please contact either

Mr Jeremy Simcock, Clinical Director, jeremy.simock@cdhb.health.nz 

or:

Mr Terry Creagh, Supervisor of Training, terry.creagh@cdhb.health.nz 

Psychiatry Services

Welcome

The CDHB is a great place to further your interest in psychiatry, whether you are looking for a junior post to further your skills and knowledge of mental health, aiming for Fellowship of the RANZCP and work as a Consultant Psychiatrist, or wanting to pursue sub-specialty training as a more senior RMO.

Why specialise in Psychiatry?

Psychiatry suits people who are genuinely curious about what makes people “tick”, who prefer to use themselves as the primary therapeutic tool rather than rely on medical technologies, and who enjoy complex problem-solving. Maintaining a holistic view of health and illness is important in all of medicine but particularly important in psychiatry.

Psychotherapeutic interactions are just as important as understanding psychopharmacology - and social systems are as important as biology. Although effectively working in a clinical team is a key value in medicine, it is absolutely critical in psychiatry. It is important to develop and hold on to excellent general medical skills but psychiatrists must routinely use a range of other skills as well, in a wide variety of inpatient and outpatient settings. So if you are interested in a specialty where taking time to hear the patient’s story and thinking deeply about what is really going on is not only encouraged but expected, then psychiatry may be for you.

Career Prospects

New Zealand has a shortage of psychiatrists and job availability in this country is likely to remain high for years to come. Many psychiatric sub-specialties are also going to be looking for skilled consultants for the foreseeable future. Other specialties value doctors with psychiatric experience because mental illnesses are common in the community.

Medical Staff in our Service

Training positions include:

12 H/O positions for PGY1 or 2 (4 are suitable for PGY1, all are suitable for PGY2). Up to 26 training positions for registrar positions are currently available, either on a short term “elective” basis or as full trainees of the RANZCP. These are all College-accredited positions and include Advanced Trainee positions in all of the RANZCP’s Advanced Training Certificates (sub-specialties). More positions can be made available as required. Satellite training positions are also available in Nelson.

All about our service

Most psychiatry services are provided by the Specialist Mental Health Services and specialist psychiatry services to older people are provided by Older Persons Health.

RMOs are team-based, with designated Consultant supervisors at H/O and Registrar levels. Some of the strengths of CDHB training are the provision of teaching and expert supervision to all levels of RMOs and the wide variety of sub-specialty rotations available, especially to registrars. Our services are some of the largest and busiest in the country and include some tertiary referral services for the South Island.

Training in our service

Although our House Officer positions do include more medically oriented duties, most of the rotations include a psychiatric case management role with our patients and individual clinical supervision provided to support this. Our Hillmorton H/Os also receive group supervision, and psychiatry tutorial teaching sessions are offered at Hillmorton and in Psychiatry of Old Age.

Registrars are all involved in a half day per week release training programme with a dedicated Training Programme - the “Walshe Centre”. College training and professional development is personally managed by a Director of Training.

In addition, ‘grand round’ and Academic Department meetings are also available.

SMO / Staff Support

Our Consultants, teams and trainees are very supportive. After hours support is also readily available from registrars and consultants.

Research

The training programme is closely linked with the University of Otago, Christchurch. The university Department of Psychological Medicine has a high research ranking and jointly runs a clinical research unit with the CDHB. In addition, the CDHB operates a Psychiatry of Old Age Academic Unit, and Consultants and teams are also involved in other independent research and audit projects.

Registrars are encouraged to take part!

Advantages to training in psychiatry at the Canterbury District Health Board

  • The CDHB is very supportive of psychiatry training at all RMO levels.
  • Training is closely linked in with the university’s Department of Psychological Medicine, which is internationally recognised as a strong research department.
  • The programme is large enough to cover a wide range of interesting rotations.
  • However, the programme is also small enough that trainees can form a supportive cohesive group and get to know the Consultant body.
  • Exam pass rates for formal College training are good.
  • Training is well supported by a dedicated training unit - the Walshe Centre.

Enquiries

Take the time to look at our website: www.otago.ac.nz/christchurch/departments/psychmed/registrartraining

Please direct any enquiries to Marie Knibb or Bridget Benoit, the Walshe Centre’s Admin Team, email bridget.benoit@otago.ac.nz or phone (+64 3) 337 7899, ext 66203.

Radiology

Canterbury DHB Radiology Service

CDHB is one of the New Zealand centres training radiologists. The RANZCR curriculum is followed and the registrars work towards their FRANZCR qualification. The full range of diagnostic radiology services and procedures which the curriculum requires exposure to are provided within Christchurch, between Christchurch Hospital, Burwood Hospital, Christchurch Women's Hospital and private centres (for example, mammography and PET scanning). The curriculum is available from the RANZCR website and prospective trainees are advised to review this to obtain an in depth understanding of the course.

Clinical radiological service provision varies between the CDHB hospitals, but round the clock emergency services are provided and our trainees become involved in the out of hours provision of this at the start of their second year. Primary radiological service exposure is obtained through reporting of GP referred examinations. Tertiary level care is provided for most specialties. Training includes rotation to private practice sites. 

Training includes exposure to all modalities required by the RANZCR curriculum. CDHB is well resources with up-to-date plain X-ray, ultrasound, CT, MR and interventional equipment. The case load and mix undertaken at CDHB easily allows trainees to fulfil the RANZCR experiential requirements.

For further information:

Dr Wayne Collecutt, Director of Training
Email:  wayne.collecutt@cdhb.health.nz 

Alexander Brunt, Manager New Zealand
The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists 
Ph: +64 4 4726470 or email: alexander.brunt@ranzcr .org.nz

http://www.ranzcr.edu.au

Respiratory Medicine

Respiratory Services provides secondary level care for patients with respiratory disorders on an inpatient, outpatient and domiciliary basis throughout the North Canterbury Region. It also acts as a tertiary referral centre for the northern half of the South Island.

At Christchurch Hospital, there is a specialist inpatient ward, where we see about 1800 cases annually. This caters for patients with acute respiratory illness and those requiring hospitalization for respiratory investigations and treatment. There is a dedicated area for the provision of non invasive ventilation using BiPAP. The outpatient service located within the outpatient area of Christchurch hospital sees approximately 1400 new patients a year.

There are currently 10 respiratory Physicians in the department, supported by 4 registrars and 3 house officers. Inpatient care is delivered by 3 teams. The department is accredited by the Royal Australasian College of Physicians and can offer 3 advanced training positions in Respiratory Medicine at any one time. Trainees can expect to gain experience in all aspects of respiratory medicine, including the core sleep component of Respiratory Medicine training. The department is also accredited for up to 6 months of advanced training in Sleep Medicine. Usually, one registrar position is filled by a basic trainee.

The department is supported by the Canterbury Physiology Laboratory and the Canterbury Respiratory Research Group, both of which have excellent international reputations. 

For further information:

Dr Greg Frazer, Clinical Director
Phone: (+64 3) 364 0640
Email: greg.frazer@cdhb.govt.nz

Rheumatology & Immunology

The Rheumatology and Immunology Service provides inpatient, outpatient, day patient and inter-hospital consultative services for patients with rheumatic disease, primary immunodeficiency and serious allergy.

Two Rheumatologists, a Rheumatology Registrar and one Clinical Immunologist run the clinical service. The Clinical Immunologist also has commitments to the Immunology Laboratory, Canterbury Health Laboratories. The Registrar position is accredited for rheumatology advanced training. The service has also been accredited for joint physician and pathology training in clinical immunology Clinical research and student teaching is encouraged.

For further information:

Dr Peter Chapman, Clinical Director
Phone: (+64 3) 364 0950
Email: peter.chapman@cdhb.health.nz

 

Urology

The Department of Urology deals with a full range of urological services for the people of Canterbury. It also provides a tertiary referral service for the South Island. The ward is combined with the Nephrology ward, providing urological management of renal transplants. Special interests include spinal injuries management. 

For further information:

Ms Sharon English, Clinical Director
Phone: (+64 3) 364 0640

Endovascular, Vascular and Transplant Surgery

Welcome

To the information page for the Department of Vascular Endovascular and Transplant Surgery (VETS).

Why Vascular Surgery

Vascular Surgery has long had a reputation for excellence and innovation. Vascular surgery is an extraordinarily diverse speciality. It deals with patients with some of the most challenging pathology and comorbidity, it involves surgery in nearly every body compartment, and uses some of the most modern and technically sophisticated techniques in medicine. Increasingly combining radiological techniques to provide better and less invasive treatments it has become a truly multifaceted, multidisciplinary specialty.

Career Prospects

Vascular Surgery is in demand. Training is coordinated by the RACS Board of Vascular Surgery and involves 5 years of SET training. SET posts are competitive and applications exceed available positions; selection is by structured CV and interview. The same is true worldwide and this reflects the exciting prospects there are in modern vascular surgical practice. The rewards of a fulfilling and challenging career lie ahead; you will never be bored in Vascular Surgery.

You will need clinical experience and academic achievements to progress. Christchurch VETS has an excellent record of paper publication and presentation at international meetings, and provides a supportive working environment to facilitate progression. 

Staff

Christchurch VETS is a small unit providing big service. There are 4 SMO grade including the Professor for Vascular Surgery at Otago, Prof. Justin Roake. In the middle grade there are three; a SET trainee; Senior Clinical Fellow; and one RMO. There is a shared RMO for cover with Cardiothoracic Surgery. There is a FY2 for ward cover. All members of the surgical team are encouraged to participate in the wealth of opportunities that the VETS service presents. On call duties are likely to involve night cover of allied surgical specialties to achieve compliant roster.

We are assisted by three Vascular Nurses, and three admin staff. Ward 10 is the Vascular and Cardiothoracic ward, and is staffed by nurses with expertise in vascular and cardiothoracic surgery. There is a dedicated ward manager and a Clinical Nurse Specialist on the ward.

Vascular at Christchurch

The Vascular, Endovascular and Transplant Service (VETS) provides tertiary level vascular surgery service for the extended region from Invercargill to Picton and the West Coast to the Chathams. We provide vascular support for all other specialities in the hospital particularly in Renal Transplant, Renal Access, Tumour Resection and Vascular Access. We provide world class vascular service and provide training for RMO’s, SET trainees and international Clinical Fellows.

Vascular surgery is a growth industry. Clinical activity has increased more for vascular surgery than for most other specialties. This reflects not just an increasing disease burden, but an increasing ability, through innovation and technology, to treat more people more effectively.

Christchurch Vascular Surgery is at the cutting edge of these modern and innovative Vascular Surgery and Interventional techniques. The ethos is one of multidisciplinary collaboration with our Interventional Radiology colleagues which we believe gives the best clinical results and the best educational substrate in which to learn.

Contact

For more information or general enquiries about RMO positions in the VETS please contact:

Tel: 03 364 9543

Or:

Tim Beresford, Clinical Director of VETS, Christchurch Hospital 
Email: tim.beresford@cdhb.health.nz 

Or through:

www.christchurchvascularsurgery.health.nz

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